Avoiding the Pitfalls of Agile and DevOps

by Jeff Sussna | at Minnebar 15 | Thu, Oct 15 • 9:00 – 9:25 in Nokomis Track | View Schedule

Do you struggle to answer any of the following questions:

  • How do we empower teams to make good business decisions?
  • How do we make sure everyone knows why they’re building what they’re building?
  • How do we deliver meaningful experience advancements and not just incremental improvements?
  • How do we scale Agile and DevOps without reintroducing friction and brittleness?

In this session I will identify common Agile and DevOps pitfalls behind these struggles. I will draw on many years of experience diagnosing and repairing broken Agile and DevOps implementations. I'll present a set of customer-centered principles that avoid the trap of “doing more work faster”. Finally, I’ll illustrate how to incorporate these principles into existing Agile and DevOps practices in order to deliver “the right thing at the right time for the right reasons”.

Intermediate

Jeff Sussna

Jeff Sussna is an internationally recognized IT coach and design thinking practitioner. He specializes in helping digital organizations improve service quality through effective collaboration. His career spans more than thirty years of building systems and leading organizations across the entire product development and operations spectrum. Jeff is Founder and CEO of Sussna Associates, a Minneapolis consulting firm. Sussna Associates provides Agile, DevOps, and Design Thinking coaching and workshops for enterprises and software service providers such as United HealthCare, HealthPartners, Thomson Reuters, Best Buy, and Calabrio.

Jeff is a highly respected teacher, writer, and speaker. His keynote talks and workshops are in demand at design and IT conferences throughout the U.S. and Europe. He is especially known for introducing the global DevOps community to the importance of empathy, and is the author of Designing Delivery: Rethinking IT In the Digital Service Economy.


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