MinneBar 10 Session Schedule

8:00 – 8:45
Arrive/Breakfast

8:45 – 9:05
Session 0

9:15 – 10:05
Session 1

Theater

Twin Cities: The startup capital of the “North"

Carson Kipfer
Ryan Broshar

A recent WSJ article titled "Minnesota’s New Cool Image as ‘the North" has stoked the discussions around declaring a new “North” region of the US and the Twin Cities serving as its "capital". While this discussion is fascinating in and of itself, how would this change specifically affect the local startup community?

Join Carson Kipfer (Co-Founder & Chief Evangelist @ SportNgin), Eric Dayton (Co-Founder of The Bachelor Farmer & Askov Finlayson), and Ryan Broshar (Founder & Managing Partner @ Matchstick Ventures) as we discuss the effects of moving out of the shadow of Chicago and the Midwest and into a the new "North" frontier.

Carson Kipfer

Carson is Chief Evangelist at Sport Ngin, which he co-founded in 2008. He evangelizes the Sport Ngin cause and core values through communication, events and experiences. He works tirelessly to preserve and enhance Sport Ngin culture. He promotes Sport Ngin to the world as he interacts with the press, the tech community, prospective employees and clients.

Ryan Broshar

Ryan serves as Managing Director for Matchstick Ventures. Founding Matchstick (fka Confluence Capital) in 2013, Ryan created a vehicle to support and interact with fellow entrepreneurs. Broshar is also Co-Founder of Beta.MN and Twin Cities Startup Week. Prior to Confluence, Ryan founded University Guide, LLC – a university-based publication business – that was eventually sold in 2008.

Minnetonka

DevOps 101, now with War Stories!

Donnie Berkholz

What is this whole DevOps thing you've heard about? It somehow involves developers and sysadmins, but what is this mythical beast and how do you ride it?

This session will show you what DevOps is all about from a conceptual and technological level, and dig into the benefits to you, your team, and your company.

It serves as a (hopefully interesting) 101-level survey of the content you can expect at DevOpsDays Minneapolis in July.

If you've attended any DevOpsDays events in the past or already practice DevOps, please join to share your perspective on how it works for you and learn what others are doing.

Donnie Berkholz

Donnie was most recently a senior analyst and "resident Ph.D." at RedMonk, where he researched the art & science of software creation and its usage by developers, data scientists, DevOpsy folks, and everyone in between. His background is diverse, including stints in science (Mayo Clinic), open-source software (Gentoo Linux), IT infrastructure, and journalism.

He's a highly experienced speaker and writer, having spent nearly his entire career in science and technology doing a lot of both.

If you buy him a good beer or coffee, he might tell you about what's next.

Proverb-Edison

Accelerating the growth of Minnesota’s digital games industry

Nicolaas VanMeerten
Evva Kraikul

According to LinkedIn’s insights team, approximately 6,550 people with game development skills have migrated from Minnesota in the past two years. This is a whopping -5% net loss of all individuals in our region with tech expertise making game development the #3 skill to leave our region.

We all know that there are few career opportunities for budding game creators here in Minnesota but what should be done to support the growth of this industry? What key players should be involved in these conversations?

This session will be an interactive discussion. Come prepared to share your thoughts, ideas, and potential action items.

Nicolaas VanMeerten

Nicolaas VanMeerten (@nicolaasvm) is a Ph.D. student in the Educational Psychology program at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on determining which behaviors are beneficial to learning in video game environments. He is also the Co-founder and Director of Interactive Technologies of GLITCH.

Evva Kraikul

Evva Kraikul (@Evvahs) is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of GLITCH, a non-profit based at the University of Minnesota that provides extensive programming to promote digital games as a culture, career, and creative practice. With 5+ years of experience at the young age of 25, Evva has already worked alongside over 50 major technology and gaming industry partners such as Microsoft, Blizzard Entertainment, Riot Games, ASUS, Valve Corporation & 3M to develop programming and events.

GLITCH FACEBOOK | GLITCH TWITTER

Zeke Landres

Legal Primer: Using Free and Open Source Software

Nathan Kumagai

“Free” and “open source” software forms the core building blocks of major business platforms and software distributions everywhere. Open source software is available under a range of licenses that give you freedom to obtain, use and distribute the software in your own programs; but with this freedom come some conditions, ranging from simple attribution for some licenses to providing source code and patent licenses in others. Some of these conditions might be incompatible with your business model, and making a mistake can cause problems when you bring your software to market or if your business is acquired. This session will discuss foundational issues about the world of open source, including:

  • What is open source software? Why is it so important?
  • Understanding open source licenses in the context of real life issues
  • Basic development process guidelines for using open source software

Armed with this information, you will be better able to make intelligent choices and decisions about how to take advantage of the benefits and manage the risks presented by open source software.

Nathan Kumagai

Nathan Kumagai is an attorney who works with software companies on open source, privacy and other software and technology matters. Nathan is a member of the intellectual property/information technology practice group at Stinson Leonard Street in Minneapolis. Nathan worked as a software developer before becoming an attorney.

Challenge

Lessons in startup PR: How to launch a product

Matt Ronge

Getting the tech press to write about your startup can drive huge amounts of traffic and give you instant credibility. The challenge is in getting the press to care enough to write about your startup in the first place.

Come learn about pitching to the press and our successful launch of Astropad. Learn about our launch strategy and some tips and tricks which drove over 200k visitors to our site in only a few weeks.

Come learn about:

  • How to pitch tech writers
  • What sites you should be pitching to
  • Coordinating your project launch
  • Using embargoes and exclusives to your advantage
  • How your launch strategy starts on day one
  • Resources for learning about PR

If you're looking to launch a project, stop on by and hear what worked for us.

Matt Ronge

Cofounder behind Astropad, retro gamer and iOS developer

Learn

Diverse Perspectives: I code. I parent. I role model. I engage.

Sara Heitkamp
Brittani Uribe

We've all heard the statistics about diversity in technology. It's easy to be a part of the problem and focus only on that, rather than working towards actionable solutions. But Brittani and Sara are solution seekers.

Weaving in their personal stories (and a little humor) with diverse perspectives, Brittani as a young Latina and Sara as a single parent and former teen parent, both women will share actions they have taken to be a part of the solution for keeping young students engaged and excited about technology.

This session will include:

-How Brittani bridges the Digital Divide through her work with Geek Squad Academy -How Sara approaches life as a single parent with a demanding career in technology -Both women sharing lessons learned (yes, even the not-pretty fall flat on your face lessons), challenges faced and solutions they've used as women in technology -Recommendations for employers, educators, parents, and professionals for continuing the engagement for young students -How we can all be role models for our next generation

About Brittani: Brittani is the Field Lieutenant for Geek Squad currently under Special Assignment with Best Buy Community Relations. She has worked 6 years for Best Buy in a variety of areas from retail cashier to best buy mobile and running in store Geek Squad Precinct as Senior CIA, all of these have allowed her to shape the idea of understanding these great brands. She travels the US representing Geek Squad and Community Relations via the Geek Squad Academy Program bring 21st century technology to teens in underserved cities, schools and nonprofit programs. Her passion is to continue to help build Best Buy’s relationship with community and employees throughout the US. Brittani serves as Co-Chair for Best Buy's LatIN Employee Network. Outside of the office she spends her time with her family and her dog. She enjoys golf among other sports. Twitter: @BrittaniNUribe

About Sara: Sara holds two positions, one of which is Mama to her 11 year old daughter Anakka. Professionally, Sara is the manager of the Associate Facing Web Operations team. Her role is to manage day to day oversight and activities related to Associate Facing Web Operations including production support, technical web duties and initiatives in support of maintaining highly scalable associate facing web applications and services for BestBuy.com. In 2014 she launched the Twin Cities Geekettes chapter and helped with the re-launch of the Best Buy Women's Employee Network. Outside of work she can be found on the volleyball court, dance floor, at live music shows, exploring Minnesota and enjoying adventures with her daughter. Twitter: @saraheitkampmn

Sara Heitkamp

About Sara: Sara holds two positions, one of which is Mama to her 11 year old daughter Anakka. Professionally, Sara is the manager of the Associate Facing Web Operations team. Her role is to manage day to day oversight and activities related to Associate Facing Web Operations including production support, technical web duties and initiatives in support of maintaining highly scalable associate facing web applications and services for BestBuy.com. In 2014 she launched the Twin Cities Geekettes chapter and helped with the re-launch of the Best Buy Women's Employee Network. Outside of work she can be found on the volleyball court, dance floor, at live music shows, exploring Minnesota and enjoying adventures with her daughter. Twitter: @saraheitkampmn

Brittani Uribe

No bio.

Stephen Leacock

Founder support - Entrepreneurship isn't a solo sport

Thomas Knoll

Startups are hard.

Most founders surround themselves with advisors and mentors for pretty much everything related to their business (SEO, Fundraising, Marketing, Business Models, Sales, etc.). But, very few get the emotional, mental, and personal support they need.

I have been employee, advisor, co-founder, or CEO of a dozen startups. Some failed miserably. Some had a decent base hit. Others are still going strong. I've seen and experienced first hand how hard this can be.

I am also married to a Marriage and Family Therapist who realized that a lot of the work she does with her couples and families can be applied to co-founders and early stage teams. She has now shifted most of her work to the executive coaching side, and I am applying everything I have learned from her to my advising and mentoring relationships.

I'd love to share what we've learned, and lead a discussion about the types of things to watch out for, as well as some very practical habits and practices we can implement in our schedules to make sure we're getting the full support that we need to succeed.

Thomas Knoll

Community Architect for 19 years. Supporter of entrepreneurs. And, I fall in love with almost everyone I meet.

Currently: Advising Taptalk.me, Mentoring 500Startups, Thinking Thomasknoll.info
Previously: Primeloop.com, Launchrock.com, Zappos.com, Uservoice.com, Seesmic.com

Dystopia

Tweets From The Dystopian Mirror Dimension: They Have Minnebar Too!

Ian Fitzpatrick

Friends,

I received a very unusual encrypted dark web video transmission this morning. On the other end was this dude who looked exactly like me, but was bald and had a pointy goatee.

He started going on about how he was from our dystopian mirror dimension, and how his planet was dying, and how I was the only one that could BLAH BLAH BLAH I sort of tuned him out after a while.

I was like, "LOOK, this is the most elaborate 419 scam I've ever encountered, so props on that. But I can't just go trusting every mirror dimension dystopian twin that wanders along, ya know?"

"So how about this," I suggested. "This Saturday is Minnebar. Following mirror dimension logic, you should have a Minnebar too. Do you?"

"We do...."

"And it runs simultaneous to OUR Minnebar?"

"Yes..."

"Perfect. Set up a twitter account, and tweet out session announcements from dystopian Minnebar as they are happening. THEN I will know you are really from our mirror dimension."

"We don't have time for this, our planet is..."

"LA LA LA I can't hear you, setup the twitter account already."

"Fine, it's done."

https://twitter.com/MirrorBar

@MirrorBar

Follow that twitter account this Saturday for administrative session reminders from MIRROR BAR.

############## NOTE TO ORGANIZER FRIENDS ##############

  1. This is not a joke, don't delete this session (And really, how dare you!)
  2. I don't need a room so please don't schedule me one
  3. If I could get a monitor with a twitter feed that would be AMAZING, but it's asking a lot I know/especially this late. All the tweets will be #minnebar anyway.
Ian Fitzpatrick

According to Wikipedia, Ian Fitzpatrick is a retired English professional footballer who played as a striker for Halifax Town and Shrewsbury Town in the Football League.

Or, I'm a Pacific Northwest transplant fumbling through Minnesotan culture. I love making things and indie people who make things. Co-founder of this fine web service (http://www.giftster.com).

Say hi to me at Minnebar, I'll be the one wearing a flannel shirt and glasses.

Let's make it weird.

@ianfitzpat

Calhoun

UX on a Lab-Style Team

Rob Stenzinger
Arthur Beisang

What makes a Lab-Style Team? Join UX Designers, Researchers, and Prototypers Rob Stenzinger and Arthur Beisang for a talk about life, change, tools, and techniques involved being a member of a Lab-Style team at Target.

Rob Stenzinger

Rob Stenzinger provides UX Design and UI Engineering services Target on the EGI (formerly RAD) Team. He podcasts about making things at Lean Into Art, teaches workshops, and makes video games. You can find him on Twitter as @RobStenzinger.

Arthur Beisang

Arthur Beisang is a User Interface and Experience designer for the Target EGI team. He’s spent a decade working on projects from small apps, to giant Ecommerce systems, and everything in between. He occasionally writes at projectsite.co and, can be found on the internets as @abiv.

Harriet

sleep with dan grigsby

Dan Grigsby

is the title missing a coma? is your sleepy hollow? morning would be easier if you slept better. a crash course in the lullabasics of sleep hygiene, falling asleep quickly, sleeping soundly and waking rested.

Dan Grigsby

Dan Grigsby is CTO at the visual search company Slyce and General Manager of its mobile development agency Drivetrain.

Dan founded Merchant Planet, an early e-commerce provider that Microsoft acquired; payMe.com, a successful early-days competitor to PayPal that sold for a 20X investor ROI; Mobile Orchard, which became the #1 iPhone developer news-site and podcast; and mobile development agency Drivetrain.

Dan received the Business Journal's "Titans of Technology" and "40 Under 40" award, Finance and Commerce's "40 Minnesotans On The Move" award, was named one of MPLS/St. Paul magazines "75 Best Brains," was one of 15 people profiled in Twin Cities Business's "The Innovatives" issue and was recognized as an "Alumnus Of Note" by the University of Minnesota.

Dan is a member of the Board of Directors for the Minnesota High Tech Association, serves on its Executive Committee and is Chairman of its Committee on Innovation. He also serves on the State of Minnesota's E-Government Advisory Committee and is an Adjunct Instructor and Entrepreneur-In-Residence the Carlson School of Business at the University of Minnesota. Dan co-founded MinneBar and MinneDemo, Minnesota’s two largest tech/entrepreneur events.

Nokomis

Go With the Flow: A Reactive State of Mind

Colin Lee

Programmers-- are you sick of passing around state?

How much time do you spend maintaining state variables, tracking state variable values across multiple threads and asynchronous callbacks, and painstakingly caring for state variables until you accidentally feed one after midnight and it turns into a gremlin?

In many languages, it seems like our job as programmers is becoming more about passing state around than it is about writing business logic. Much of this is due to the added complexity caused by asynchronous callbacks.

Reactive to the Rescue

There is another option. It is new paradigm called "reactive programming."

Reactive programming treats data variables as flows or streams of events over time. These event streams can be combined, filtered, mapped, and manipulated in many ways.

Reactive programming borrows ideas from functional languages like Haskell and Scala. However, the difficulty of writing programs with reactive extensions is greatly reduced because programs are still allowed to use easy concepts of "imperative" languages like variables, looping, and side effects.

Programming with streams requires far fewer state variables, offers thread safety benefits, and does not suffer from "callback hell."

Who Uses This?

There are plenty of lesser-known companies who use reactive extensions. But there are more than a few household names as well.

Netflix

"Netflix is a big believer in the Rx model, because Rx has made it much easier for us to build complex asynchronous programs. RxJava is effective on the server for us and it spreads deeper into our code the more we use it."

Microsoft

"Reactive Extensions is a set of libraries that makes asynchronous programming a lot easier. If asynchronous spaghetti code were a disease, Rx is the cure.”

GitHub

"Using Rx and ReactiveUI, we've written a fast, nearly 100% asynchronous, responsive application, while still having 100% deterministic, reliable unit tests. The desktop developers at GitHub loved Rx so much that the Mac team created their own version and are now using it on the Mac to obtain similar benefits." What We'll Cover

We will start by discussing Java 8 streams. This will provide a quick introduction to the concepts.

Then we'll dive into Netflix's library providing reactive extensions to Java, RxJava. RxJava can do everything Java 8 streams can do, but do it asynchronously.

Finally, we'll explore Elm, a functional reactive programming language for the web that offers both two-way data binding similar to AngularJS and some truly unique features-- hot-swapping of running code and a time-traveling debugger. Elm's unusual features allow a programmer to make and observe program changes while the live program is running.

Will I Benefit?

You should understand the concepts of programming in at least one language. Reactive extensions exist for more than a dozen languages, including the following list. These extensions offer a real paradigm shift for authoring asynchronous code, handling errors, and managing state.

  • Java: RxJava
  • JavaScript: RxJS
  • C#: Rx.NET
  • C#(Unity): UniRx
  • Scala: RxScala
  • Clojure: RxClojure
  • C++: RxCpp
  • Ruby: Rx.rb
  • Python: RxPY
  • Groovy: RxGroovy
  • JRuby: RxJRuby
  • Kotlin: RxKotlin
  • Cocoa: ReactiveCocoa

True functional reactive programming (FRP) languages like Elm provide a real WOW factor for those who have never witnessed a time-traveling debugger in use. As a programmer, it would be hard to walk away from this session without learning something interesting.

I gave an Android-specific version of this talk in front of over 100 developers at AnDevCon 2014 in San Francisco and 96% of attendees gave positive reviews. Several tweeted that this talk was one of their favorites at the convention.

Learn more at ReactiveX.

Colin Lee

Colin is an Android engineer at Vidku, a hot Minneapolis startup in the "mobile devices for education" space. He has been programming since he learned BASIC on the TRS-80 computer in his parents' basement at age six.

Brand

App Developers: Containers are in your Future

Paul Lundberg

The container hoopla has swept the technology industry in the past year. But, it’s still the early days for containers. Containers are core to what Google does. Google spins up more than two billion containers a week - it knows how to manage containers at scale.

Now Google is looking to take the lead in this growing market. Google was the first big vendor out with a container product with their announcements at Google Cloud Platform Live in November 2014. Since then, the dust continues to stir.

Come and learn how containers are helping us to move toward a future of widespread Platform-as-a-Service. This presentation will address the following questions:

  • What are containers?
  • Why is this so important to Google’s Cloud Platform strategy?
  • Why didn’t this happen earlier?
  • How will containers change the way I develop and deploy applications?
  • I develop on AppEngine: Aren’t I already developing in containers?
  • What are other Platform-as-a-Service platforms doing?
Paul Lundberg

As Agosto's CTO, Lundberg is responsible for product development vision, intellectual property strategies and leveraging open source and proprietary technologies. Lundberg oversees product development for clients and for commercialization by Agosto. He is a member of the Google Cloud Platform Partner Advisory Board, contributing and gaining visibility into Google’s computing platform roadmap.

Recent awards for Paul and Agosto include first place in the Google Work in the Future Development Contest, as well as recognition for Agosto's Google Cloud Platform development work.

Past speaking engagements: -Devfest 2015: App Developers: Containers are in your Future -GDC 2014 Keynote: Building Scalable Products on Google Cloud Platform -Google Developer Group January 2015: Material Design -GDG Dec 2012: Google Cloud Platform - A Developer's Perspective -BigCloud Sales Conference Jun 2013: New Possibilities on Google's Cloud Platform -Going Google Roadshow Oct 2012: GCP - Agosto Solution Demonstrations

Discovery

Never Trust Any Published Algorithm

Mark Gritter

Certainly any algorithm that's been peer-reviewed multiple times must not have any obvious errors, right?

What about algorithms by leaders in the field, which come with proofs of correctness, and form the basis for tons of later research? Nothing of that stature could be flawed, could it?

But those are purely academic concerns, with no practical impact. It surely couldn't be the case that something as basic as a sorting algorithm, which was implemented multiple times and tested, fails to operate correctly?

In fact, I'll show examples of all three of these. Let's have a conversation about the ways in which algorithms fail--- and the ways to increase confidence that your algorithms and designs are correct.

Mark Gritter

Mark Gritter is co-founder of Tintri, a storage startup based in Mountain View, CA. Previously he worked at Kealia, a video streaming startup aquired by Sun Microsystems in 2004.

Mark's interests include large-scale software design, Internet architecture, startups, games, and poker.

Twitter: @markgritter

Gandhi

Burn that notebook! Password management for the masses

Jeff Lin

In this session, you will learn some tools and tricks to help you manage your ever-growing number of passwords. We'll walk through a password management tool such as 1Password and Dashlane and learn how to generate, store, and share strong passwords. If you follow the steps outlined in this session, you will never write down another password and you will never use your first dog's name or birthdate in your password again.

You'll learn how to:

  • Protect your online accounts by converting all your logins to use strong passwords such as rG%]9uk8f7&nfCb2@reRh8Z&NTp4x.
  • Log in to any web account without actually knowing the username and password.
  • Securely share a login with another person. Never email passwords in plain text again.
  • Synchronize your encrypted password database through the cloud to multiple devices such as a smartphone or multiple computers.
  • Securely store all types of information such as credit cards, bank accounts, social security numbers, addresses, coordinates to buried treasure, etc
  • Burn that notebook that has all your passwords.
Jeff Lin

@jefflin is the founder of @teambustout and co-founder of @gosmartfactory.

Tackle

Where To Find A Drink In Minneapolis

Brad Armstrong

Using the new Open Data apis published by the city of Minneapolis, plus RxJava/RxAndroid, Retrofit and Google Play Services, we'll explore how to build a truly useful Android application.

Brad Armstrong

I've been writing software with wildly varying levels of elegance and cleanliness for over 17 years. Currently I'm a software engineer at Code 42 where I've been stretching the limits of the Android platform for the last 4 years.

Louis Pasteur

Fiery Inferno: Outsourcing Web Projects Edition!

Toby Cryns

Being a web freelancer ain't always peaches and cream. Let's face it, sometimes you say "yes" to things that you cannot do. Soooo you need to find someone else to do the work - a friend, a colleague, oooooh....someone on the other side of the planet that you have never met.

Come to this session prepared to talk about the challenges (and successes) you're having related to hiring others to do your work in your web business.

Things your fellow freelancers might want to hear from you about:

  • How do you price outsourced work?
  • How do you hold others accountable?
  • How much do you pay people to do the work?
  • Is oDesk.com going to kill your ability to make a living wage?
  • How do you keep track of things that need to get done?

What's frustrating you about your outsourcing business right now? Maybe others have had the same obstacle and overcome it.

Your contribution will make or break this session, so don't be bashful!

WARNING: A group hug MAY occur near the end of this session. (We're not saying we'll instigate one, but we wouldn't stop one either).

PS - Aspiring web freelancers and aspiring outsourcers are totally invited.

2013 Fiery Inferno

Toby Cryns

Toby Cryns has been running outsourcing experiments for the last 2 years or so and has built a successful web business whose final product is mostly outsourced to freelancers in other countries.

MinneBar-day is his favorite day of the year.

10:15 – 11:05
Session 2

Theater

Managing Tech Teams

Scott Davis

I've spent most of my career managing developers, from informal peer-to-peer leadership, to big corporate structure. In recent years I am most often approached by non-technical entrepreneurs attempting to start a technology company, with no experience or skill in working with those of us who are the "difficult to deal with" nerds and geeks.

Scott is CEO of QONQR, a bootstrapped mobile gaming company in Minneapolis and adjunct professor at St Mary's University in the Information Technology Management program. This session will be a 50 minute summary of the master's class Scott teaches on "Managing Technology Teams". We'll focus on the negative stereotypes, communication issues, trust concerns, and the challenge of ambiguity. The goal is not to teach entrepreneurs how to best manage your technical team, but expose the dynamics of working with technical teams that may be new to non-technical managers, or software developers not accustomed to working with new tech managers.

Scott Davis

Scott is the CEO of QONQR. He has been a software developer longer than he hasn't. Scott holds an MBA in New Venture Management from the University of St Thomas.

QONQR is a game on the iPhone and Windows Phone (Android available in beta). Players use the GPS on their phones to battle for and capture the towns and cities where they live, work and play. Since the release in March of 2012, over 850,000 towns and cities, spanning nearly every country in the world (2 more to go in Africa) have been captured. QONQR is a MMO (Massively Mulitiplayer) location-based mobile game, which now covers 30% of the populated Earth.

Harriet

Your startup is newsworthy (probably). How to generate media attention

Chuck Grothaus

You launched your startup, but trade and business journalists aren't paying attention. Why not? Have you created and nurtured the right relationships? Are you sharing the right messages? Have you offered an exclusive?

Get the insider tips and strategies you need to effectively tell your startup story to journalists and other key opinion leaders. We will discuss:

  • Developing your communication strategy
  • Creating a compelling story for local, regional and national news media
  • Obtaining published news coverage
  • Communicating with investors/potential investors
  • Crafting thought leading content for social media channels
Chuck Grothaus

Chuck Grothaus has helped organizations like Gateway, ADC Telecommunications, Medtronic and UnitedHealth Group share their voices with internal and external audiences for 20 years. His expertise is rooted in reporting and writing copy, public relations and strategic corporate communications. Chuck’s communication skills have helped Fortune 500 companies grow awareness and manage reputation with careful analysis and a thoughtful approach. Since 2012, he has successfully crafted and executed communication plans for many industries and organizations of all sizes.

Brand

How to Make a Bonsai Tree out of Math

Paul Cantrell

The Como Conservatory asked Bust Out Solutions to build an interactive iPad kiosk for visitors to make a virtual bonsai. The trees are algorithmically generated, so every one is unique. You might have seen us demo the finished app at MinneDemo a few years back, but this time, for MinneBar, I’ll share the secret recipe and show how we actually built it!

They’re made out of math

The goal was to engage and educate visitors (and keep the kids busy for 10 minutes). This posed an interesting kind of problem very different from traditional mathematical modeling: we needed a software model of a tree which was not necessarily predictively accurate, but perceptually and emotionally engaging. What makes a tree seem like a tree? What makes a shrub different from a mature tree? What makes a tree exciting enough that a kid doesn’t walk away from it?

This type of programming & mathematical modeling — the kind where the goal is not scientific, but aesthetic — is of widespread and rapidly growing importance. It’s the work video game designers have done for decades, but it’s increasingly pervasive throughout the world of human-computer interaction. It’s what shot the iPhone from “they’ll never take a bite out of Nokia” to … well, now.

This talk will walk through the story of how we created the virtual bonsai by bringing together graphic design, programming, and mathematics. Along the way, we will get a taste of graphics techniques from the game industry, and encounter tidbits from a surprisingly diverse array of mathematical disciplines.

P.S. Note to the math-averse: This talk will be accessible to a broad audience, and will not require knowledge of mathematics or programming. The ideas are intuitive, there will be lots of pretty pictures, and the results are fun!

P.P.S. There will be a few juicy technical details for mathematicians too.

P.P.P.S. Fractals! Fractals! Fractals!

Paul Cantrell

Paul fell in love with programming at first sight on an Apple ][+ in 1982, and never looked back. He is a freelance software developer who mostly works with Bust Out Solutions, and teaches computer science at Macalester College in the spring. Living a secret double life as a classically trained composer and pianist and artistic director of The New Ruckus, he brings a musician's passion for aesthetics and nuanced detail to the craft of writing software, which makes his bio sound all fancy.

Proverb-Edison

JavaScript Application Tooling for a Modern Development Experience

Aaron Ackerman

The number of tools for JavaScript projects has exploded since Node.js created a practical solution for running JavaScript outside of a browser window. New tools exist to easily add modularity to a JavaScript front-end application codebase and use a subset of new JavaScript syntax, even in older browsers that companies still have to support today such as IE8.

In this session I'll discuss and provide examples of using build tooling to create a modern development workflow for JavaScript heavy applications.

I'll cover some notable features of ES6 JavaScript. I'll introduce the Babel project. I'll cover integrating Babel with grunt, gulp, webpack, browserify, and simple npm scripts. I'll also cover using Babel with source code, test code, eslint, and jshint.

Most of this talk will be aimed at front-end/browser JavaScript applications, however the information about Babel and ES6 is also applicable in server-side JavaScript projects. It will be impossible to go into any depth about any single tool mentioned above, the intent is to show what is possible right now with prepared, concrete examples.

Aaron Ackerman

I work on JavaScript UI projects for work and spend time on open source and learning guitar when not at work. I tweet at @_aaronackerman_ on twitter and I write open source at @aackerman on github. Always striving to write high quality software.

Zeke Landres

Going Lean: Let's Talk Tangibles

Sara Cowles

We've heard the buzz, read the articles, skimmed the books. Lean, design thinking, fostering a culture of innovation—it all makes sense. And we know this. An analysis by the Design Management Institute identified design-driven companies as measured by the level of senior-level representation and commitment. They found that the design-driven companies outperformed the Standard & Poor’s 500 by a whopping 228%.

Count us in. But what are the tangible steps we can take to actually effect change? How can we start to make a positive difference within our own organizations?

We’ll discuss core principles, tangible steps and common hurdles that we face along the path to joining this revolution.

Common hurdles:

  • We’re a start-up. We have no resources or experience with UX.
  • We’re an enterprise. We have too much bureaucracy.
  • We have a distributed team. How can we possibly build shared understanding?
  • We’re measured by different metrics. How can we convince the leadership to get behind this?
  • This is new and unfamiliar. How do we actually make it happen?
Sara Cowles

Director of UX and Engineering at Dell Cloud Manager, formerly Enstratius.

Gandhi

A11y Moneyball - 3 Common Mistakes of Website Accessibility

Bill Tyler

Website accessibility is often treated like an mysterious "dark art", something coders add at the end of the application design cycle.

It shouldn't be.

Deep analysis of the WCAG 2.0 accessibility standards reveals 3 common mistakes that directly impact the ability to deliver an accessible website.

Using this analysis Optum Technologies (part of UnitedHealth Group) developed a new approach: AA11y "A-Squared 11 Y"

Its benefits are improved accessibility in less time with reduced reliance on specialists (like the presenter).

Whether it's to open your web app to a broader audience or deal with increasing legal requirements these insights should help improve your project's accessibility.

Bill Tyler

Accessibility Specialist, Interactive Design Strategy, Optum Technology

UX/UI/A11y Designer/Developer with 30+ yrs, mostly in healthcare (medical devices, health plans) including 18+ yrs. on web.

Tackle

“I See Innovation Ecosystems”

David Quimby
Clyde Hanson

Our region enjoys innovation ecosystems that are vibrant / robust – “and” they could be more productive. “Network Explorer” is a new tool for social network analysis that makes innovation networks visible and actionable. Exposing relevant contributors and their relationships enables strategies and tactics that broaden and deepen the innovation ecosystem to become more targeted and effective.

Collaboration across technical, functional, and organizational boundaries produces high-value innovation. Our technique identifies and supports interdisciplinary "boundary-spanners" who connect separate domains. 3M has determined that boundary-spanners develop some of their most strategically important technologies. IDEO indicates that inter-disciplinary collaboration is a fundamental principle of modern innovation.

Our proprietary, Web-based system accesses publicly available information and eliminates labor-intensive, time-consuming, and inaccurate survey methodologies. We can observe product categories, investigate historical trends, and compare an organization or region to its competitors.

We’ll demonstrate the system and visualize some innovation networks on the fly. We’ll also share some of the regional insights that we’ve obtained with “Network Explorer” as a research tool. We’re seeking discussion and additional perspective around application domains, use cases, network metrics, other fun stuff.

David Quimby

David Quimby is the inventor / founder of Adaptive Avenue -- an emerging hypermedia platform for automatic viewing of personalized Web content -- and an expert in user experience / design thinking. He is an economist, technology forecaster, and recovering corporate executive; he is also a thought leader in change management, organizational agility, and innovation ecosystems.

Clyde Hanson

Clyde Hanson is a marketing expert focused on intellectual property valuation and analytics. He hosts the weekly “Innovators & Entrepreneurs of MSP” meetup group sponsored by the Schulze School of Entrepreneurship at the University of St. Thomas.

Louis Pasteur

NoSQL - Polyglot Persistence

Michael Helfer

A brief introduction into nosql databases with a slightly deeper dive into Cassandra.

Michael Helfer

No bio.

Calhoun

Driverless Vehicles - You Won't Be Driving within Three Years

Reed Robinson

In this session we'll cover...
- Where are we today? (Further than you think)
- How did we get here? (Thanks Google!)
- What does it mean for future industries? (Epic disruption)
- What can we do about it in MN?

Reed Robinson

Co-Founder of a defunct tech startup - Heroic
Co-Founder of Beta.mn & Twin Cities Startup Week
Director of Sales & Marketing at Worrell Design

Minnetonka

Burnout and Depression Uncensored

Paul Prins

It happens to the best of us. It's been a part of each one of my startups, and my guess is that it happens to us all in various degrees. The goal here is to be cathartic, to help us realize that its real, that it happens to each of us, and how we can cope well until we swing out of the roughest parts.

I'll be sharing a great deal from my personal experiences with depression, startups, tech, highs/lows, and some insights from the journey. This isn't a talk from someone on the other side (if that exists) but someone who is very much changing the world from where I am. I believe you can do the same.

My hope for this talk is that we can understand we're not alone, find encouragement, and get a few tools to help along the way.

Extended Bio
I earned a business/psychology degree (called service management), and my masters was in divinity (with a course load in counseling/psychology/systems). I've also worked with many people over the years in various stages of life (parents, students, hospice, homeless). I'm not a psychologist (I run a software company) and would gladly recommend people if needed.

Paul Prins

Founder and CEO of Fresh Vine which we started in 2009 and launched in spring 2011. We were a part of Rise of the Rest, and the MESA Group making strong inroads/growth in our market.

I'm passionate about technology, how it integrates into our lives, the MN startup space, as well as travel, restoration, freestyle skiing, and good books. Previously ran Midwest Skier from 1999-2006.

Get Social: @PaulPrins | LinkedIn | Google +

Nokomis

CoAP: The IETF's New Protocol for the Internet of Things

Patrick Barrett

The Constrained Application Protocol is a new protocol from the IETF that is specifically designed for the Internet of Things. It is designed to use much less data and allow interesting asynchronous communication all while being simple enough to be handled by an 8-bit microcontroller.

This talk will be technical deep-dive into the protocol starting with the basics. It might be helpful if you have a cursory understanding of the relationship between IP, UDP, TCP, and HTTP, although I will be giving a 2 minute overview near the beginning of the presentation. By the end I hope that you will have a solid understanding of how the protocol is different from its closest competitors and why (I think) it is the right protocol for the Internet of Things.

Come see my overly complicated demo where I try to make a WiFi devkit communicate with scripts built into my slides. (And laugh at me when it inevitably fails.)

Patrick Barrett

Patrick Barrett recently graduated from the University of Minnesota with an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering. He now works for Exosite where he is an Embedded Software Engineer that sometimes gets asked to write Javascript. He also finds it slightly odd writing in the third person.

Challenge

The Coding Samurai: The Way of the Computer Warrior

Ian Felton

The technologies we use are constantly changing. As consultants, the race to keep up doesn't end. However, other more important things don't change. Drawing on millennia-old lessons, this talk is an explication of Bushido-inspired aphorisms to remind us how to walk the IT career path gracefully.

This presentation is tailored for those interested in a career as a software consultant or those who already are. However, full-time employees can also find plenty of value in this series of "reminders." This presentation isn't about how to set up an S-Corp or which CPA to use. It’s about how to stay relevant and not lose yourself. It’s about a code of conduct to strive for that benefits you and those around you. It’s something to take with you on the path from someone who has taken a similar path.

Plus, I will be aided by my pet cat.

Cat

Kunming Temple
-- Photo credit, Ian Felton, Kunming, China

Ian Felton

Ian's LinkedIn Profile

A consummate beginner, I have 20 years professional experience building PC's, administering systems and writing software while working on initiatives for NASA, Mayo Clinic, US Dept. of Defense, Thomson Reuters, Best Buy, US Bank and many, many more.

I started building PC's with my dad in 1990. At the same time I broke open a Turbo Power C book and compiler on a 286. From Pascal and ADA, I moved on to Perl, JavaScript, Java, PHP and C#.

In 2008, I founded a non-profit, Marching Mountains, to obtain musical instruments for struggling band programs.

I enjoy writing, philosophy, playing in a band, brewing root beer, world travel and nature photography. I'm also a student of Chinese culture, with an intermediate proficiency at speaking, reading and writing Chinese as well as a practitioner of several Chinese martial arts including: 太极拳, 八卦掌,and 形意拳

Learn

VR in 2015: Develop now for what's coming

Zach Wendt

Cut through the hype for a concise understanding of what VR hardware and experiences are coming this year.

Learn The Don'ts for designing and coding terrible VR experiences, and The Do's of interactions uniquely suited to VR.

We'll give this all some context by covering some basic perceptual psychology, including some fun illusions.

By request, I'm adding a quick overview of how you can use consumer hardware today to develop Vive-like VR experiences that have free walking with hand input ...as long as you don't mind looking like Rick Moranis.

I always prefer an interactive audience, so discussions, questions, enthusiasts and skeptics are all welcome.

Zach Wendt

Zach Wendt started graphics programming on an Apple ][+ with a cassette drive. Projects are much more fun now, thanks to more than 6 colors, plus a ridiculous collection of headsets, tracking devices and depth cameras.

Zach currently organizes the monthly meet ups for MN VR and HCI, and previously ran IGDATC for 7 years. Both groups can be found at igdatc.org

Discovery

The Changing World of Publishing

Charles Edge

When I wrote my first book on OS X Server, it was printed and shipped, and one day I saw the book randomly show up in a Barnes and Noble. And that was the only way books got published. One day, my publisher told me to start a blog, which I begrudgingly did. 3,000 posts and 12 books later, the publishing industry has completely changed. In this session we'll go through why to publish content, how to publish content, where to publish content and if you actually want to get published in print, where to do that. I only know anything about technical publishing, so of course, we'll be talking about that and not how to be the next Hermann Hesse. Although who knows...

Charles Edge

Charles has been breaking Apple products since gnawing on an Apple II as a child. Professionally, he worked with Apple products while working in labs at the University of Georgia (LC era) and then took a break from the platform while working with Unix and Windows servers at Andersen Consulting. Charles started back up with Mac OS and Apple server offerings again in 2000, when he joined 318 Inc, a consulting firm in Santa Monica, California, which under his guidance as Chief Technology Officer became the largest Mac consultancy in the world at the time. Charles is now a Product Manager for JAMF Software, where he manages their latest offering Bushel.com (link), providing Mobile Device Management for smaller organizations.

Charles writes a number of books, primarily about Apple security, deployment, scripting and server technologies. Charles also has a personal/technical site, at link.

Stephen Leacock

Think Different On Your Go To Market Strategy- $2.5 Capital Raise - $1 Million a Month in Orders before Launch - case study

Jeffry Brown

This is a case study on how not doing sameness by developing a 'Think Differently' go to market strategy got this Minnesota based startup $2.5 million in capital and in excess of $1 million a month in orders before it launched. You will hear the process used to create a strategy that is slated to disrupt a multi-billion dollar market and will be generating in excess of 4 million dollars a month in revenue at the end of year two with already signed orders.

If you're an entrepreneur that has a great idea you should hear this story and look at evaluating your go to market strategy. You will learn how looking at your market and how existing companies in that market are positioned, can be turned to your advantage.

Jeffry Brown

Jeffry Brown Executive Coach/ Serial Entrepreneur
jeff@jeffrybrown.com 612 382-4005 http://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffrybrown http://twitter.com/#!/IdeaWhiz

STANDOUT - THINK DIFFERENTLY Every life is a story. My story includes many adventures, some successful, some great learning experiences, (agile failures have great lesson too), all valuable and part of who I am and what I can do for you to standout, grow, transform, and think differently. Working with Steve Jobs at Apple in the early years, heading the Hal team, I learned the value of starting with WHY and helped envision what has become the iPhone and iPad. I've started and led businesses, including CEO of a publicly traded company. I focus on the WHY first, then the bottom line.

Today, working out of CoCo Minneapolis, I love helping entrepreneurs strategize on new go to market opportunities. Founding partner at VoiceHive and Global Cashspot.

11:15 – 12:05
Session 3

Theater

Piranha Pool (TM) II

Jeffrey C. Robbins

Sponsored by AngelPolleNation, Piranha Pool (TM) II is Minnesota's own live take on the TV series "Shark Tank." -- and our second year of doing it at MinneBar! A panel of experienced, local tech investors will, on the spot, consider investments in FishFood (TM), aka local entrepreneurs. Confirmed returning Piranhas are well-known local investors Joy Lindsay, Ed Cannon, David Dalvey and Barbara Stinnett. Details on how to apply to participate as FishFood are here: link.

Joy Lindsay has been an active member of the Minnesota venture capital community since 1998. She is President and co-founder of StarTec Investments, LLC, a private venture capital firm focused on investing in high-tech companies based in the Midwest.

In addition to her role at StarTec, Ms. Lindsay is a member of the Sofia Angel Fund, a Minnesota-based womens angel fund focused on making private equity investments in companies founded by or led by women, or whose products and services target women. She is also a member of the Gopher Angels, a group of angel investors who share screening and due diligence and is a founding member of MOJO Minnesota, an innovation co-operative working to fuel entrepreneurship and reignite Minnesotas culture of innovation. Further, she is an advisory board member to Matchstick Ventures (formerly, Confluence Capital Partners).

Ms. Lindsay is a member and past chair of the Minnesota High Tech Association board of directors, is a member of the Advisory Board at the Holmes Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Minnesota, and has served as Secretary and Vice-President of the Minnesota Venture Capital Association. She is a judge for the Minnesota Cup business plan competition and serves on the Planning Committee for the Annual Minnesota Venture & Finance Conference.

Prior to founding StarTec, Ms. Lindsay was a Senior Vice President in the Westlaw division of West Publishing (now Thomson Reuters). She has a B.A. in mathematics from Carleton College and an M.B.A. from the University of Minnesota.

Ed Cannon is CEO of Zivix, a multi-patented fingertip-sensing technology for use in real musical instruments and peripheral devices. Ed spent the first years of his career with the Westinghouse Power Systems group before leaving and co-founding Cannon Technologies in 1987. As CEO of this start-up, he lead the team to sales in excess of $100 Million and 150 employees. Cannon Technologies was one of the first truly smart-grid companies, helping electric utilities better manage demand response, substation automation and smart meters. Cannon Technologies was acquired by Cooper Industries (NYSE: CBE) and is an integral part of their Energy Automation Solutions group today. Ed holds a BSEE from South Dakota State University and was honored by them as Distinguished Engineer 2007. He is also an Entrepreneur in Residence at the University of Minnesotas Carlson School of Management.

David Dalvey is a Managing Partner of Brightstone Venture Capital since September 2000, and he has 26 years of venture stage investment experience with 16 years as a venture fund manager and 10 years as a technology investment banker. Also, Mr Dalvey has 34 collective years of corporate board director/advisor experience.

Previously, Mr Dalvey has been a general partner at Food Fund Venture Capital II, L.P. from 1992 to 1995 and also held senior investment banking management positions with R.J. Steichen and Company from 1995 to 2000 and Wessels, Arnold & Henderson from 1987 to 1992. During his career, Mr Dalvey completed 40 public common stock offerings and 90 private placements totaling over $1.75 billion in equity growth capital for technology and life science companies. He currently serves as a Director at Mobile Realty Apps, Horizon Oil Field Services, Celcuity and Blue Rock Advisors and has also served Director roles with AppTec Laboratories, Navarre Corp., Definity Health, CHF Solutions, Nature Vision, TestQuest, Agiliti, Digitiliti and ShoreLunch Recipes.

Barbara Stinnett is CEO and Managing Partner of the Timmaron Group, a consulting organization that provides guidance, experience and interim executive support to CEOs, boards of directors, private equity investors and venture capital firms. Barb is the Executive Chair of Canopy Co. Among her many business accomplishments, she served for 22 years as a senior executive with Hewlett Packard, most recently as Worldwide Vice President and General Manager for Marketing, Sales and Service.

Jeffrey C. Robbins

Jeff is an attorney and shareholder in the business services practice group at Messerli & Kramer P.A. in Minneapolis, Minnesota. For 30 years, he has represented entrepreneurs who start and grow technology-based enterprises and angel and venture investors who target those companies. He is a serial entrepreneur himself, having founded two companies in the entertainment ticketing industry. Jeff represents high-growth, high-potential private enterprises and publicly traded companies. In 2011, he founded AngelPolleNation, a Twin Cities-based networking organization for investors. He has served as an advisory service member to the Minnesota Angel Network and serves as an advisory board member to Gopher Angels, a Minneapolis-based investor network. Jeff is also a judge for the annual statewide Minnesota Cup business plan competition and a regular adjunct lecturer at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. He is a board member of Venture Academy, a new Minneapolis charter school focused on developing entrepreneurial leadership skills for its students. Jeff was named in 2011 as one of “200 Minnesotans You Should Know” by Twin Cities Business magazine.

Harriet

Git & GitHub Tips & Tricks

Joshua Wehner

Do you have questions about git and GitHub?

Are you new to git or GitHub, but want to learn what all the "social coding" fuss is about? Want to "level up" your contributions to open source? Curious to learn how GitHub uses GitHub to build GitHub?

Bring your questions to this Q&A about Git and GitHub. I'm Joshua Wehner (@jaw6 on GitHub!), a developer and trainer at GitHub, I'll do my best to answer all your questions, tell stories, do a few demos, and I'll bring plenty of octocat stickers for everyone.

Joshua Wehner

I'm a Trainer and Software Developer at GitHub. I have survived three winters in Minneapolis.

Nokomis

Design first development.

Nate Edwards
Bradford Hosack

Flipgrid reached 1 million users in its first year. In all the work we do, design comes first. We start our work with a focus on the user experience and work backwards.

You'll get a chance to hear from Flipgrid's Co-Founder and Director of Dev Ops on what it takes to break old models, inspire a development team to put design first, and how $17M can be used to bring our product to the world.

www.flipgrid.com www.vidku.com

Nate Edwards

Nate researches, designs, and develops experiences rooted in discovering new paths of exploring the connection between the digital and physical worlds. When not hovering over a glowing device, he is busy researching, writing, and having dance parties with his young son.

Bradford Hosack

Brad is an award-winning designer and developer. He is an author, developer, and thrill seeker. He is a Co-Founder of Flipgrid, a PhD student, and on his way to becoming a three time national champion.

Brand

Lightning Talks

Luke Francl

Lightning talks are back!

Lightning talks are short, rapid-fire talks that aren't scheduled in advance. At the session, we'll spend a few minutes gathering topics, and then presenters will go in reverse order of the amount of time they request. We'll keep going until we run out of speakers or time.

Luke Francl

Luke is one of the co-founders of minne✱, the organization behind MinneBar and MinneDemo. He now lives in San Francisco, where he is a software engineer at Swiftype, a startup that provides search engines as a service.

Challenge

Securing Web Applications - Using Intercepting Proxies for Fun & Profit

Douglas Frank
Daniel Sandau

In the age of web-based applications, ensuring client-server apps are configured securely is of paramount concern. With intercepting proxy tools you can easily understand how a web application works and start manually testing it. They allow its operator to act as a man-in-the-middle between a browser and the target application.

This session will briefly discuss when in the Secure Software Development Lifecycle 'dynamic analysis' security tools should be used and primarily teach how intercepting proxies can be used to improve security of these types of applications. The use of the 'Burp Suite Pro' intercepting proxy to identify security problems with web applications will be demonstrated.

Douglas Frank

Leads Best Buy's Secure Software Development Practice where white hat hackers test applications and assist developers in creating secure code since 2008.

Daniel Sandau

Works for Best Buy's application security group as a white hat hacker since 2013, where he tests applications and assists development teams to secure their code.

Discovery

How to encrypt personal communications and why you should

Colin Bartol

Your right to privacy is under attack by the NSA and local police departments. Routinely we are subjugated to searches by the government which would make our Founding fathers turnover in their grave.

Fortunately there are simple tools to help fight this. You will learn what is encryption, how to encrypt your phone calls and text messages using Signal, and be introduced to sending email through PGP.

Colin Bartol

I am an IT infrastructure project manager who cares about civil liberties and the plight of the brachycephalic cat.

Calhoun

Kids, Code and Diversity

Jaim Zuber
Jean Weiss
Marie Gottschalk
Rebecca Schatz

Minnesota’s tech community is awesome, but not very diverse. Wouldn’t it be cool if there were more women in tech? How many African American, Hmong or Latino developers do you know? How can we fix these digital divides?

Part of the answer is starting young, and making sure that girls and kids of color have the opportunity and encouragement to learn to code. You can help. Come learn what it’s like to volunteer helping young people to code.

This session highlights the Technovation Challenge and the Northside Code Clubs, two initiatives from the local nonprofit, Code Savvy. We’ll also include a quick update of local CoderDojos (including CoderDojoTC) plus other opportunities that combine kids and code.

• Technovation[MN] enables young women to dream up, design, code and pitch original mobile apps – a unique blend of technical and entrepreneurial challenges. This year there are 30+ teams are now gearing up to present their apps at the gala Appapalooza in the Minneapolis Convention Center on May 3. Learn how you can help Technovation[MN] and other initiatives encouraging girls and young women to code.

• The Northside Code Clubs are places for kids and teens to learn to code in a free, fun, open-ended environment, out of school at several partner sites in North Minneapolis. The program is now expanding to other targeted communities. The young coders explore Scratch, AppInventor and Web languages as well as electronics and robots. Most importantly, they enjoy becoming creators – not just users – of modern technology.

Join us to inspire a diverse, new code-savvy generation!

Jaim Zuber

Jaim does iOS development. He's part of the the iPhreaks Podcast. You can find his written thoughts preserved on twitter and his blog.

He likes baseball, BBQ, biking and making noise with a modest array of instruments… sometimes in public.

Jean Weiss

Board Member of Code Savvy and Technovation[MN]. After a long career in technology, I am now following my passion for improving diversity in the technology community. Code Savvy is a not-for-profit inspiring kids and teens to become code-savvy, that is, to understand the kind of creative thinking that goes into coding, and to try out programming computers and devices. Through Technovation[MN], a program of Code Savvy, we are "enabling women to transform the world one mobile app at a time".

Marie Gottschalk

No bio.

Rebecca Schatz

Founder of Code Savvy a nonprofit organization inspiring a kids and teens to explore computer programming and creative problem solving. Code Savvy initiatives include CoderDojo Twin Cities, TechnovationMN, Get With the Program and the Northside Code Clubs. Tweeting @CodeSavvyOrg @rebeccaschatz

Minnetonka

The State of Startups

Jeff Pesek
Mike Bollinger
Ryan Broshar
Patrick Meenan

Let's have a real conversation about the startup culture in Minnesota!

Who are the makers vs. the takers?

What are our strengths and weaknesses?

Where is the action happening?

Why are we mediocre?

How can we be better?

Jeff Pesek

Co founder, TECHdotMN.

Mike Bollinger

Explorer and entrepreneur. Livefront, TECHdotMN, and Smart Factory

Ryan Broshar

Ryan serves as Managing Partner for Confluence Capital and is one of the co-founders of Beta.MN. Founding Confluence in 2013, Ryan created a vehicle to support and interact with fellow entrepreneurs by providing early stage venture capital finance. In addition to his work at Confluence, Broshar is Founder and CEO of BoomBoomPrints.com – a social commerce platform for graphic design artists to sell their artwork on products to families. Ryan is a previous MN Cup student division winner with University Guide, LLC – a university-based publication business – that was eventually sold in 2008. Ryan received his BSB from the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management and his MBA from University of Colorado-Boulder.

Patrick Meenan

Patrick Meenan is a Director at Arthur Ventures. Patrick joined Arthur Ventures from Microsoft where he spent time in its Corporate Development group, executing merger and acquisition transactions, and in Operations for Microsoft Advertising, executing strategic partnerships and key operational initiatives. Select transactions and partnerships included Microsoft’s divestiture of Razorfish to Publicis and Microsoft’s investments in AppNexus and Adchemy. Prior to his time at Microsoft, Patrick was an investment banker with Piper Jaffray’s Technology Group and KeyBanc Capital’s Mergers & Acquisitions Group. Patrick holds a bachelor’s degree in Business from Miami University and serves as a board observer with Intelligent InSites.

Proverb-Edison

Networking 101: How to Network with People not Computers

Jennifer Simon

Speaker: Jennifer Simon

Jennifer has been in sales for over 20 years, networking with people has been a key factor in her success. Early on in her career she realized that helping others came naturally and in return people are willing to help her. All of her job opportunities have come from some kind of networking, she continually builds new business through her connections and is constantly helping others connect with the right people to reach their goals. Whether it’s through direct personal relationships or simply making connections on Linked In.

As she has integrated into the IT Industry, she become aware that networking does not come naturally to a lot people. This presentation will help those who want to learn some basic tips and tricks on how to meet new people.

Jennifer Simon
Zeke Landres

You know what would be nice...

John Cosgrove

This session will be heavy in interaction so bring a fully charged phone...

Start with a basic business idea and bring it to market as quickly as possible and empower your clients to be part of the development idea process by allowing them to request, "you know what would be nice..." Implement these ideas as part of your offerings and go from there until you have a platform designed and built from the most valuable sourcing group...your clients...(who will also pay good money for your work).

Boot building and Strapping...

John Cosgrove

immigrated to the Twin Cities from his native Northern Ireland in 1999. Starting his new life alongside the legendary pub (and now whiskey) mogul Kieran Folliard, he stepped out on his own in 2006 with an event services business. His experience as a presenter, emcee, and facilitator is as diverse as it is wide. He has hosted more than 300 corporate events, many for Fortune 500 companies. In addition, John has created a number of software applications including VoiceHive, to help facilitate more engaging audience participation that can be measured.

Twitter @irishcosgrove

Tackle

Improvisation: How to Unleash Creative, Flexible, Cohesive Teams

Jim Barrett

This is not a lecture, but a “hands on” workshop where you’ll learn what games and exercises improvisers use to sharpen their listening skills, become more spontaneous, quickly generate new ideas and improve collaboration. You will be able to use these tools on your own projects after this workshop.

Improvisation has been described as “The art of not knowing what you are going to say or do and being OK with that." Life and business don't offer a script to follow and improvisation develops skills such as solving problems with no clear solution in sight. Truly innovative or disruptive ideas don’t come easy. Improv can help you generate ideas and work. We’ll push the furniture out of the way and get you on your feet. Come prepared to join in improvisation games and exercises all the while not knowing what will happen next. And we'll have fun doing it.

Jim Barrett

Jim Barrett is an, entrepreneur and improviser.  He has performed at the Minneapolis Fringe Festival, Huge Theater, Brave New Workshop and the Minnesota State Fair.  As founder of Leads4Growth, Jim has been providing creative service and tech companies with strategic business development support for over 10 years. This year he founded Off Script, to help companies find their creative mojo, healthcare organizations improve the patient experience and people suffering from addiction to lead new lives.

12:15 – 1:35
Lunch

1:45 – 2:35
Session 4

Theater

Fear & Failure

Patrick Byrne

In this talk, I discuss imposter syndrome, fear of failure, and how to combat them; I follow this up with a discussion on ways to cope with (inevitable) failure and benefit from it. Feel free to take a look at the slides and a rough script if you want to know more about the content.

I've given this talk at a number of meetups around town, and it's always lead to lively and insightful Q&A and audience discussion, which is always my favorite part.

Patrick Byrne

I never know what to write in these spaces without sounding either trite or phony. Probably the easiest way to learn about who I am at the moment is by taking a look at my Twitter profile, though my wife is arguably funnier, better looking, and smarter than I am and my 5-month-old son is certainly more adorable.

I write software (a lot of it publicly visible on GitHub), mainly because I can't not. I work at Dribbble, the awesomest social network for designers. I enjoy cooking and reading.

Harriet

State, Immutability, and Persistent Data Structures

Brian Maddy

Have you herd any of these phrases before?

"Try it again"
"Try refreshing the page"
"Restart the server"
"Reinstall the program"
"Reboot"
"Reinstall the operating system and then the program"
"Hmm, it must have been a fluke"

We'll talk about what you've witnessed when you hear these phrases and how immutability and persistent data structures can help. Along the way we'll learn the difference between values and identities, look at what it's like to program with persistent data structures, why we might want to do that, and discuss a little philosophy. We'll use Clojure for some examples (no previous experience necessary), but these concepts apply to any language:

JavaScript

Java

Python

Haskell

C#

Clojure

Scala

Ruby

Brian Maddy

Brian is a software developer who has been writing code in Minneapolis for the past 15 years. Sometimes for small startups, sometimes for Fortune 50 companies. Currently, he works at Vidku. He has a strong interest in functional programming and started the local clojure.mn user group back in 2010. He's been organizing it ever since.

Nokomis

Building Lightning-Fast Websites

Joe Strommen

How fast does your website load?

Research shows that website performance affects business-critical metrics like conversion rates and user engagement.

With the technology available today, average load times of 1 second for new users and 100 milliseconds for returning visitors are absolutely achievable.

Come to this session to learn and discuss techniques to make your websites load (virtually) instantly.

Joe Strommen

Joe Strommen is a software consultant specializing in web performance. He has spent most of the last year working on FasterWeb.io, a startup SaaS that automatically optimizes websites.

Joe lives in Bloomington, MN with his wife and two little kids, ages 1 and 3.

Zeke Landres

Use Storytelling to Build Your Brand and Engage Buyers

Jim Dahline

Two things I believe more than anything that drive marketing in today's world:

1) People hate to be sold to, but they love to buy. 2) Buying is based on timing more than anything.

People are buyers when they are engaged with your company, product, or brand and the timing is right. But how do you exactly do that? What things can you do, and in what ways, to engage with people and be top of mind when the timing is right for them to turn into buyers.

We'll discuss this concept and strategies to ensure your business is top of mind for buyers.

Jim Dahline

Jim is a Director of Marketing at Sport Ngin, a Minneapolis based sports technology company focused on the youth and amateur sports market. In his role, Jim focuses on Customer Success and Account Management functions as well as the Sport Ngin Community. He also serves as a company evangelist helping to build the Sport Ngin brand through press relations, social media, & event participation.

Jim graduated from the University of Minnesota-Duluth with a degree in Marketing, and received his MBA from the University of Nebraska. He also serves as a volunteer for minnestar.

Challenge

Planning a Startup Accelerator in MN

Matt Otterstatter

Many entrepreneurs have lamented that there is no active accelerator program for startups in the twin cities. There are lots of meetups & networking events, but little in the way of education for aspiring entrepreneurs. Several initiatives to address this gap are underway in the community, and this MinneBar session would be a good forum to discuss them....it'll also be a chance to hear the specific details of one particular plan and offer feedback on it.

Matt Otterstatter

Matt is a founding partner of Vilicus Ventures, an early-stage VC firm headquartered in Minneapolis, MN, focused on connected healthcare. He is a Kauffman Fellow, which is a global program dedicated to spreading entrepreneurial best practices from Silicon Valley to the rest of the world. Matt has built and run a startup accelerator in California and also serves as a Techstars mentor across multiple programs. He serves on the board of several university departments advising entrepreneurial curriculum. Matt's background is in rocket propulsion, and he helped develop the world's first 3D printed rocket engine at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

Discovery

Lean Startup: Building Product-Market Fit & Your Business Model

Carla Pavone
Justin Porter

An overview of the Lean Development methodology to translate ideas and IP into successful business ventures. Converting ideas into customer solutions that generate financial and/or social value may be an art, but there's also plenty of proven science in the process.

With a little help from the infamous Ali G, we'll review and apply a variety of Lean LaunchPad techniques:
-- business model canvas
-- customer development
-- hypothesis testing
-- minimum viable product

This session will give you a set of tools and resources you can use to develop a startup (or a new product), and also give you command of the latest entrepreneurial lingo. "Pivot" anyone?

Carla Pavone

Carla Pavone is the Associate Director of the Holmes Center for Entrepreneurship and leads MIN-Corps, which facilitates technology commercialization across the U of Minnesota through seminars, courses and coaching. She also teaches entrepreneurship, strategy and leadership courses at the Carlson School of Management. Academia is Carla's third career. She started out in publishing and pc software startups, then was an executive in the financial services industry, where she led corporate internal startups and turnarounds. She later went back to school for her PhD, with a focus on entrepreneurship and venture capital decision making.

Carla also serves on the board of Social Venture Partners - Minnesota, which supports Twin Cities social ventures that focus on at-risk youth. As an SVP partner, she is currently helping Reve Academy, where North Minneapolis high school students learn digital skills and run a web design business.

Justin Porter

Mr. Porter has numerous years of experience in a variety of technology and business roles. His current position is working in an environment where he is responsible for launching high technology-based start-up companies. He previously worked with a variety of consulting clients in a professional services role. He has a balanced mix of consulting, industry, and technical experiences, allowing him to be leveraged in all phases of a company. Mr. Porter has experience across many industry verticals including life sciences, physical and engineering sciences, software and information technology, and agriculture. Mr. Porter holds a BSB in Management Information Systems and Entrepreneurial Studies from the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities and an MBA from the University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management.

Louis Pasteur

Excel to Database to Excel, a Round Trip via Rails

Ben Leadholm

Businesses have too much logic encapsulated in Excel workbooks. This is so twentieth century. Learn how to migrate your worksheets into database tables, and leverage the Rails platform to perform calculations, sorting, and reporting. Learn how to export information into Excel workbooks to share with colleagues.

OS Platform: (primary) Windows and (optional) Mac OS

INTRO (Part I) : Intro to Rails, Databases, and why you should migrate business logic away from Excel.

Part II: How to set up Ruby and Rails on a Windows notebook.

Part III: How to leverage Rails and Gems to migrate Excel workbooks (both in the old .xls and new .xlsx formats) to database tables.

Part IV: How to perform calculations in Structured Query Language (SQL). If there is time, we will explore

Part V: How to leverage Rails to display your data in different formats.

Part IV: How to export your data as an Excel workbook, with different formatting.

Ben Leadholm

A developer for almost 20 years, starting out with Excel macros and parlaying those skills to an entry-level development position. From VB3 to Ruby (with a stint of .NET and Java in between), Ben Leadholm has grown with the Internet. Ben now works at SportsData LLC (yes, we're hiring! SportsData LLC ).

Excel is an awesome tool, but thousands of business analysts never get beyond it. There are things that Excel (and OpenOffice / LibreOffice ) can do that no other software application can touch, but there are limits to what and how much can be analyzed.

If you run your business off a series of Excel workbooks, this presentation will give you insights into transitioning your business onto a more robust platform.

Calhoun

Beyond REST: Web Services Designed for Mobile

Sam Kirchmeier

Creating the best possible mobile experience extends beyond the device to the services your app depends on. The unique constraints imposed by mobile devices should influence your API design. Learn how to build great mobile web services, what REST doesn't cover, and lessons from years of experience designing and refining mobile web services.

Sam Kirchmeier

I'm a speaker, teacher, and software developer at Livefront. I build apps with a variety of technologies (like Rails, ASP.NET, and handcrafted HTML/CSS), and I specialize in making awesome software for iOS devices. When I'm not coding, you might find me dreaming about coding, teaching at Smart Factory, or out on the disc golf course. (Come on spring!)

Minnetonka

Anyone Can Code

Abbie Tuckner

With the current state of education, is college worth it?

How do tech bootcamps change the future of education?

And finally, how do we diversify the world of technology?

Join the conversation.

Abbie Tuckner

Abbie is an 18 year old apprentice at Software for Good and recent graduate of DevBootcamp Chicago.

She new to the tech world and wants to bring her perspective and experience to seasoned ears.

A passion of hers involves diversifying the process of developing technology. She believe that in an ever-changing world of unique people and complex issues, we need diverse teams of people working together to develop technology that will astound, astonish, and satisfy the needs of each and every person.

Brand

What's it's really like to work in Game industry

Chip Pedersen

"You get paid to play games all day?" Everyone thinks the video game industry is just fun and games. I'm here to tell you it's not. It complex software development and problem solving with a twist. Not only do you have to make a solid software program, on time, on budget. You also have to make sure its fun. Building games is hard enough. Building a game that is fun and makes money is even harder.

Discover all the different positions that have to come together to make a hit video game. Learn the differences of working at AAA publisher, a developer to a startup indie studio. The highs, the lows, the late nights, where we harvest unicorn tears and lots of caffeine. Did I mention caffeine? Over my 20 years in video games I have seen it all, and lived to talk about. Please come with questions, prepared to laugh and learn why we don't get paid to play games all day.

Chip Pedersen

Chip Pedersen has been in the tech Industry for over 26 years. Chip has held senior positions at Microsoft Game Studios, Activision, Griffin International, Outdoor Partners Entertainment and Concrete Software. His team and development experience covers numerous platforms and genres. Chip has directly managed AAA development teams of 60 people and working with remote teams around the world. Prior to joining the gaming industry, Chip honed his tech skills as a Research & Development Specialist at Apple Inc. in Cupertino, California and Andersen Consulting's Advanced technology Group in Chicago. Chip’s team building philosophy centers around one key concept: the project always comes first. Born up on the range Chip is back in Minnesota after spending too much of his life on the West coast. One of his major goals is to help build Silicon Prairie and kept talent, teams here in Minnesota.

Proverb-Edison

DevOps in a box: a Vagrant-based continuous delivery pipeline on your workstation

Charles Betz

Learn DevOps automation techniques with the power of Vagrant. See a walkthrough of the GitHub-based Calavera project -- a complete Continuous Delivery pipeline on your own workstation! The project is based on Virtualbox with Vagrant and Chef scripts which build a local 6-node VM cluster:

  • A simple test-driven development environment including application (using Java, junit, ant, and Tomcat)
  • Local and central git instances
  • Commit-driven automated build via Jenkins
  • Artifactory package repository storage of final build package
  • "Production" environment deployment via Artifactory & Chef

The project is free for download from GitHub. It provides a "walking skeleton" solution for various problems with tool integrations, SSH keys, permissions, and so forth that can otherwise be a hassle to work through.

Hear also the motivations behind the project, intended as a microkernel of a larger enterprise IT simulation and currently in use for instructional purposes at the University of St. Thomas. Finally, provide feedback as to how the project should evolve! (Docker? MEAN stack? Monitoring? Ticketing?)

Charles Betz

Charlie Betz is the founder and CEO of Digital Management Academy LLC, a training, advisory, and consulting firm focused on Lean and empirical approaches to managing the “business of IT.”

He is currently leading the development of an open IT management standard with The Open Group IT4IT Forum.

He has served as a Chief Architect with AT&T, and previously Research Director for IT Portfolio Management at Enterprise Management Associates. He spent 6 years at Wells Fargo as VP and Enterprise Architect for IT Portfolio Management and Systems Management and held product owner and architect positions for Best Buy, Target, and Accenture.

He also serves as an instructor at the University of St. Thomas, currently responsible for the "IT Infrastructure Management" course.

He blogs at www.lean4it.com and is author of The Architecture of IT Management (formerly Architecture and Patterns for IT) and co-author of several works with Lean collaborators and for ISACA’s COBIT.

Charlie lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife Sue and son Keane.

Learn

Learn to Sell Your Ideas to Investors, Collaborators, and Potential Customers, a Surefire Way to be Successful

Jeffry Brown
Chris Carlson

A Case Study The Dancing CEO, the Non-sleazy Salesperson, and the Customer Buying Experience.

The hallmark of every value-driven experience is the amount and depth of genuine human connection–that bond between an individual and a brand, an experience, an organization or an idea. The power of genuine connections extends not only among peers, but also to friends, loved ones, and even within yourself. And most importantly for entrepreneurs to investors, collaborators and customers.

Through a recent case study, this session covers more than half a century of experience bringing practical solutions in innovation, collaboration and communication to market that will guarantee a genuine connection.

A small start-up is boldly challenging Fortune 500 company's notions of sales, value, and even corporate culture, and they are winning. They've raised money, ignited collaborators, and closed millions in sales. Featuring a dancing CEO, a reinvention of the salesperson and a reframing of the "sales experience", this case study is unlike any you've ever heard.

You will leave with a greater grasp of the strengths and challenges, presence or absence, and untapped potential of genuine connection in your professional and personal life.

Jeffry Brown

Jeffry Brown Executive Coach/ Serial Entrepreneur
jeff@jeffrybrown.com 612 382-4005 http://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffrybrown http://twitter.com/#!/IdeaWhiz

STANDOUT - THINK DIFFERENTLY Every life is a story. My story includes many adventures, some successful, some great learning experiences, (agile failures have great lesson too), all valuable and part of who I am and what I can do for you to standout, grow, transform, and think differently. Working with Steve Jobs at Apple in the early years, heading the Hal team, I learned the value of starting with WHY and helped envision what has become the iPhone and iPad. I've started and led businesses, including CEO of a publicly traded company. I focus on the WHY first, then the bottom line.

Today, working out of CoCo Minneapolis, I love helping entrepreneurs strategize on new go to market opportunities. Founding partner at VoiceHive and Global Cashspot.

Chris Carlson

Founder of NarrativePros, a training and consultancy dedicated to inspiring the value of human connection, Chris is an entrepreneur leveraging decades of experience as a professional stage, screen and voice actor as well as a practicing immigration attorney. Through an aggressive inter-disciplinarian approach, Chris seeks to create better stories in all guises and better storytellers in every profession. This pursuit is shaped by and grounded in the practical challenges and resources that businesses and individuals are confronted with.

Gandhi

What Smart Watches mean for mobile experience design

Mike Bollinger

Wearable technology is quickly changing how we play and work. As 'wearables' become ubiquitous, creating remarkable mobile experiences will require more than simply releasing an incredible smartphone app. Mike will discuss what wearable tech means for the future of mobile user experience design and how organizations should think about mobile design strategy when building or expanding their digital products.

Mike Bollinger

Explorer and entrepreneur. Livefront, TECHdotMN, and Smart Factory

Stephen Leacock

Collaborating with Government (or anybody, really)

Bill Bushey

"government is essentially what we do together that we can’t do alone." - Jennifer Pahlka

Often, to effect change in your local community, you have to work with a government. As an organization focused on facilitating community change with collaborative creation, Open Twin Cities has had its far share of government partnerships and interactions in its short history. In one year alone, Open Twin Cities collaborated with Minnesota's Secretary of State, MN.IT Services, and Hennepin County on three events, and worked with the City of Minneapolis to enact an open data policy. Along the way we've learned a thing or two about working with government, creating partnerships, and collaborating.

Ever wondered what it's like to work with a government? Or just curious to hear some lessons on collaboration? Then this session is for you.

Bill Bushey

Bill is a Civic Nerd, a developer and wonk who works at the intersection of technology and society. He's a Co-Founder and Lead Organizer of Open Twin Cities, a grass-roots non-profit that works to fosters an inclusive community of civic collaboration and champions open government and civic technology for positive social impact.

Tackle

Digital era: Information/option Overload - (Check # of apps in your phone)

Vinoth Gopalakrishnan

As we all know there is ton of information & options available to choose in this digital era. And do we always know are we making the right choose in terms of cost & efficiency(If you are tech/geek & keep up all the trends still you might come little short, now think about common man/women) For e.g Who is the best orthopedic surgeon in town and how to get an confirm/appointment with him now because i am in knee pain)

Consumer Application Statistics: 1. Millions(MM) of Mobile Applications(Android/iOS) 2. Companies that provide same/similar service/complementary - 25 Mobile Apps(Either Android play or iOS) or More

Would like to talk about information overload they we are dealing with every day in & out(still growing) and have proposition & love to get your awesome feedback(Shot holes or stones)

Vinoth Gopalakrishnan

Consumer/Enterprise Product & solutions background. Technology naive entrepreneur, dreaming the dream. sometimes sleeps too much and no sleep at all.

2:45 – 3:35
Session 5

Theater

Anatomy of a Redesign: Making the new StarTribune.com

Jim Bernard

StarTribune.com will be re-launched just two weeks after MinneBar with a completely new look-and-feel. But this redesign is really a complete rebuild with an entirely new publishing platform and approach. During this session we'll look under the hood at how a modern media company re-invents itself from the CDN all the way up to the shiny new design and transforms the way it delivers the news in the process.

Jim Bernard

Jim Bernard is the Senior Vice President of Digital at the StarTribune. Previously he ran MarketWatch.com. He is a member of the Minne* Board of Directors.

Harriet

How to design the fun out of things

Brock Dubbels

There is nothing more wondrous in software than a dancing bear. Well, maybe an evil dancing bear. In this workshop, learn to express your schadenfreude through the design of software. Learn the glorious irony in the creation of pain stations: a paradise lost complete with repetitive treadmills of grinding.

Alternatively, if you enjoy babygoats on trampolines and other "happy things, this session will provide a model for learn to design invoke play, and sustain it through interaction and feedback, and if you are evil, then take it away. We learn three aspects of discount design methods as simplified user testing, narrowed prototypes, and heuristic flow models for delivering software for impact and persuasion.

Create live action simulation, with insights on the difference between imitation and emulation, and when they are most useful. Use ethnographic methods for conducting contextual analysis, learn about data-informed models; create documentation like procedural workflows and hierarchical flow charts for the creation of your very own WAAD (work activity affinity diagram) fro creating needs, requirements and design

Brock Dubbels

Brock Dubbels currently conducts psychological research at the GScale Game Development and Laboratory at McMaster University. He has worked as a Fulbright Scholar at the Norwegian Institute of Science and Technology; at Xerox PARC and Oracle, and as a research associate at the Center for Cognitive Science at the University of Minnesota. His specialties include user research, user experience, and software project management. He teaches course work on games and cognition, and how learning research can improve game design for return on investment (ROI). He is also the founder and principal learning architect at www.vgalt.com for design, production, usability assessment and evaluation of learning systems and games.He is also the founder of the HammerTownCoderDojo.org, an organization providing free programming instruction to children, and is the Editor in Chief of the International Journal of Games and Computer Mediated Simulations.

Nokomis

Polymer - Google's library of HTML5 Web Components Making web dev awesome

Lloyd Cledwyn

Lloyd Cledwyn will present on Polymer. Polymer [http://polymer-project.org] is a toolset that Google is working on to promote and ease the use of webcomponents [http://webcomponents.org].

Polymer

Webcomponents are a major improvement that come with HTML5 standards. This talk will discuss the background of webcomponents, give some examples of where they are useful and provide some concrete places for you to get started with WebComponents on your own. Depending on time there are hands on labs that you can experience building a simple app and implementing webcomonents.

Lloyd Cledwyn

Lloyd is the Director of Advancement I.T. at Macalester College, organizer of the Google Developer Group in the Twin Cities [http://developers.google.com and http://gdgtc.org], adjunct instructor at the University of St. Thomas Graduate Programs in Software [http://stthomas.edu/gradsoftware] and general proponent of open web development.

Proverb-Edison

Hardware Hacking a new musical instrument with an Arduino and an Electric Guitar

Logan Poelman

How do you create a new type of musical instrument using the right sensors, arduinos and some clever ergonomic engineering?
I invented a way to play bass and guitar, at the same time,
using the same 4 fingers and thumb you normally use to play guitar,
on a regular old electric guitar.
(with a bunch of software and hardware and sensors)


Learn about analog to digital sampling, physical computing, MIDI, arduino, physical design, prototyping and more!
I will talk about the design issues, coding challenges, going from idea to POC to prototype to pilot.
Design of the pedal:

Various parts

boards for the POC (too big to actually fit in the pedal)

POC that will evolve into the Prototype of the pedal (the tiny blue board is a Arduino Nano that will be the brains of the pedal. picture of guitar pedal prototype

take a listen/look at:
the guitar stomp pedal with the OLED display:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa9AMa5YzFA
initial POC:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7l4vXMsPbo
improved the software: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6dz0rJP8cY

Logan Poelman

Grew up building stuff with RadioShack parts and hacking junk I found in the garbage.
Built my first synthesizer when I was in 7th grade ( UJT Transistor oscillator design). Started programming on TRS80 + Apple II's in 1978
Started playing guitar in 1979
Started my programming career building Video Games in assembly language on the IBM PC & C64, in the late 80's.
(you can play "Ajax" at https://archive.org/details/msdos_Ajax_1989)
Worked on Wall Street for about 10 years building ginormous scale systems.
Former Adjunct Professor at NYU in the Computer Science graduate program.
Guitar player & musician
(my old band)

Inventor.
Noodler.
I've been hacking the Arduino since 2009.
Hacking the Raspberry Pi since 2012.
Over the years, I have programmed in: Ruby, JavaScript, Java, C#, VB.Net, VB, Forth, C++, C, Fortran, SNOBOL, Pascal, Basic
and Assembly (on 6 architectures - ARM,ATMEL AVR, 8086, 6502, Z80, PDP)
I have programmed CPUs, GPUs, DSPs, MCUs in Assembly, C and less soul crushing languages.

My day job: Director of Enterprise Technical Architecture for Best Buy, Co.
BTW, I'm hiring highly talented Technical Architects that can still write code -
see http://www.bestbuy-jobs.com/job/Richfield-Enterprise-Architect-Technical-Job-MN-55423/240808300/ )

Challenge

Lessons Learned in Starting a Podcast

Ian Bannerman
Andy Tinkham

More and more people are listening to podcasts, and more and more people are beginning to create them. While it's easy to get started, there's many aspects to consider beyond just get a mic and talk into it.

Recently, Ian Bannerman and I launched a podcast on software testing called Testing Bias. We found the process to be much more involved than we initially thought, as well as being more rewarding. In this session, we'll share what we learned and how we progressed to the point of getting episodes launched.

Ian Bannerman

Building, breaking, learning.

Andy Tinkham

I'm Magenic's global Practice Lead for Quality Assurance and Testing, and the co-host of the Testing Bias podcast (http://www.testingbias.com). I love to talk about testing, craft beer, board games, and many other topics.

Tackle

Supporting tech innovators in MSP

Matt Lewis

How can the Minneapolis-Saint Paul region better support innovative people in the technology community? We think that's a question the entire region should be asking by handing the mic to those very people and making their challenges everyone's challenges. Because we'll all benefit from shared prosperity.

Our regional economy is capable of producing tens of thousands of new jobs by 2020 that we don't have the talent to fill. At the heart of this looming workforce gap is tech talent. It's leading to a lot of exciting efforts to develop talent at all points of the human capital pipeline. But then we also need to do a much better job retaining those people and attracting other talented tech professionals from around the world.

We won't be able to do that if this isn't a place where people are able to thrive. We need innovative people to step forward and tell the rest of the community—be it companies, policy makers, educators, neighbors, whomever—what needs to happen to ensure tech professionals can reach their full potential here.

A growing assortment of partners across all of our sectors are increasingly committed to supporting innovative people. But they don't have the solutions. They need to hear from you. Whether you are a tech entrepreneur, freelancer, or innovator within a major institution, this is an opportunity to step up and set the agenda.

We hope that participating in this session will make a significant impact in the development of an emerging cross-sector, region-wide talent initiative to make a great place even greater.

Matt Lewis

I'm a Strategy Manager for GREATER MSP, the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Regional Economic Development Partnership. I get to work with a wide variety of cross-sector partners - from local governments and community organizations to Fortune 500 leaders and entrepreneurs. Before that I was at the University of Minnesota earning my MBA and a Master's of Public Policy.

I've worked and consulted for a variety of organizations from large companies to small nonprofits on public affairs campaigns and strategic marketing initiatives. I also used to be an investigative journalist with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with experience at regional and national outlets including time at the Center for Public Integrity in Washington, DC.

I spend a lot of my free time working with civic organizations that try to directly engage and involve more people in local policy issues. I serve on the boards of Conservation Minnesota and FairVote Minnesota and as communications chair for the Citizens League.

I'm at @LewisMinn if you want to connect.

Louis Pasteur

Investors love SBIR that support technological innovations with commercial potential.

Pat Dillon

Got a innovative technology-based idea, concept or project at the fuzzy front end of technology development. Come and learn about the $2.6 Federal Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Programs that provide non-dilutive seed funding for early stage innovations. You will learn if SBIR/STTR funding is right for your company or project, and whether this highly competitive source of funding is applicable to your research and commercialization strategies. The session will cover the who, what, where, when and why of the SBIR/STTR Programs.

Speaker: Ms. Pat Dillon, MBA, has worked with hundreds of technology companies over the past 20 years in both Minnesota and Wisconsin resulting in more than $50 million in federal research funding to support innovation and technology commercialization.

Ms. Dillon is the director of MN-SBIR that aims to foster a more innovative Minnesota economy focused on turning new ideas and inventions into products and technologies that spur job growth and competitiveness while promoting economic development. In this position, she is responsible for the strategic direction and leadership of MN-SBIR and its services to small businesses and startups in Minnesota.

Pat Dillon

Ms. Pat Dillon, MBA, has worked with hundreds of technology companies over the past 20 years in both Minnesota and Wisconsin resulting in more than $50 million in federal research funding to support innovation and technology commercialization.

Ms. Dillon is the director of MN-SBIR that aims to foster a more innovative Minnesota economy focused on turning new ideas and inventions into products and technologies that spur job growth and competitiveness while promoting economic development. In this position, she is responsible for the strategic direction and leadership of MN-SBIR and its services to small businesses and startups in Minnesota.

Calhoun

Creating Small Teams that Kick A$$ and take names

Chip Pedersen

This is and interactive talk NOT a lecture. Tired of working at a big company? Want to start your own small team, studio or startup? Managing smaller teams, budgets and timelines are much different than when you had levels of management or a large company behind you. You will need to take a completely different approach when creating your own team. you need to be be prepared to manage communicate and interact with your studio team.

  • Seal Team 6 vs the Fab 5
  • Right people, Right role
  • Who’s in charge?
  • Who is your cheerleader?
  • We don’t need a stinking producer (Yes you do)
  • Communication is even more important for a smaller team
  • You will need a better firing policy than hiring policy
  • Onsite/Offsite?

This talk is NOT about how to get funding. This is after you have the funds and starting to build the team. Find a lawyer, an accountant and a benefit person for other items you will need. This is about building and managing a successful team.

Intended audience & prerequisites: Anyone who is starting a new small team or would like to improve how the team interacts.

Session takeaways: Attendees will have a better understanding how to build a small team, manage them, communicate with them and create your own norms.

Chip Pedersen

Chip Pedersen has been in the tech Industry for over 26 years. Chip has held senior positions at Microsoft Game Studios, Activision, Griffin International, Outdoor Partners Entertainment and Concrete Software. His team and development experience covers numerous platforms and genres. Chip has directly managed AAA development teams of 60 people and working with remote teams around the world. Prior to joining the gaming industry, Chip honed his tech skills as a Research & Development Specialist at Apple Inc. in Cupertino, California and Andersen Consulting's Advanced technology Group in Chicago. Chip’s team building philosophy centers around one key concept: the project always comes first. Born up on the range Chip is back in Minnesota after spending too much of his life on the West coast. One of his major goals is to help build Silicon Prairie and kept talent, teams here in Minnesota.

Minnetonka

The Tweetskirt: A Javascript Developer's Journey Into Hardware

Kristina Durivage

This session will be an overview of how to build an article of clothing that displays tweets, along with a system to moderate those tweets. It will cover the Spark Core, a touch of C++, Node/Express and wearable design.

Kristina Durivage

Kristina Durivage is a software developer by day and a hardware hacker by night. Her portfolio can be found at portfolio.gelicia.com

Brand

Lessons in Product Dev. - Because You Can, Doesn't Mean You Should

Reed Robinson

Product development, be it hardware or software, usually begins with a definition of product requirements. Best case, those requirements are informed by a hefty amount of market research and a preliminary engineering/development assessment. Worst case (and most commonly), the requirements is a list of "wouldn't it be cool if...s" that are based on a competitive product, which continue to change in the midst of developing your product.

In this session we'll talk about...
What makes a good product so good (they do one thing really well)
How to identify the feature that can make your product successful (your user testing may not reveal it)
How to manage feature creep along the way (grow a pair)

Reed Robinson

Co-Founder of a defunct tech startup - Heroic
Co-Founder of Beta.mn & Twin Cities Startup Week
Director of Sales & Marketing at Worrell Design

Zeke Landres

MNvest Equity Crowdfunding (how to fund your business online)

Zach Robins
Ryan Schildkraut

MNvest is a new way to fund Minnesota companies. Currently in front of the legislature, the system would permit equity crowdfunding, or the ability to raise small amounts of capital from many people online. MNvest is intended to provide wider, cheaper, and faster access to seed funding for entrepreneurs and growing businesses. Over the course of this session we will discuss the proposed system and identify opportunities for Issuers, Portals, and Investors. In the meantime, please learn more and sign the petition at MNvest.org.

Ryan Schildkraut

Ryan Schildkraut is a business transactions attorney who advises companies of all sizes on a wide range of business matters, including entity formation, fundraising, corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions, licensing, real estate, and tax. Ryan adds value for clients by quickly focusing on the meaningful issues in the transaction and efficiently leading the parties through the structuring, negotiation, documentation, and successful closing or completion of each deal.

Ryan regularly counsels start-up companies and entrepreneurs on selecting the appropriate type of entity for their businesses, drafting organizational documents (including shareholder agreements, LLC agreements, and member control agreements), raising money from investors, hiring employees and independent contractors, negotiating commercial leases, and developing customized business contracts. He is a strong advocate for Minnesota entrepreneurs and small business owners. After years of working with clients who felt that federal and state laws impeded their ability to raise money from investors, Ryan co-authored proposed legislation called MNvest, which would legalize securities crowdfunding in Minnesota. He has organized a group of politicians, business leaders, and other supporters in a grassroots campaign to educate Minnesotans on crowdfunding and to persuade the Minnesota legislature to enact MNvest.

Ryan is dedicated to helping companies grow their businesses through acquisitions, joint ventures, strategic partnerships, securities offerings, and re-financings. He also advises business owners in the sale of their businesses.

Although Ryan works with all types of businesses, he has extensive experience in the following industries:

Software and Technology: Prior to attending law school, Ryan graduated first in his class from the nationally-ranked Information Technology Management program at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business. His background in systems architecture and software development is a valuable resource to Ryan’s clients in high-tech industries, who regularly rely on his expertise when drafting and negotiating terms of software licensing agreements, software development agreements, and similar technology-related contracts.

Craft Brewing: Ryan represents start-up and mid-sized craft breweries on a variety of matters, including raising money from investors; securing debt and equipment financing; obtaining required permits, navigating through complex licensing regulations; negotiating brewery leases, beer distribution agreements, and beer ingredient procurement contracts; selling distribution rights; and applying for trademarks and protecting other key intellectual property assets.

Multi-Unit Franchise Operations. As an integral part of Winthrop & Weinstine’s Franchise Legal Team, Ryan works closely with buyers and sellers in significant M&A transactions involving the purchase and sale of multi-unit franchise operations. Ryan regularly reviews and negotiates purchase and sale agreements, loan agreements, franchise agreements, lease agreements, landlord estoppels and consents, subordination and non-disturbance agreements, and other real estate documents. Since 2010, Ryan has assisted multi-unit franchise owners in M&A and financing transactions involving more than 500 restaurants throughout the United States, with an aggregate transaction value of more than $360 million.

In 2014 and 2015, Ryan was named a "Rising Star" by Minnesota Super Lawyers®; these highly regarded attorneys are 40 years old or younger, or have been practicing for 10 years or less. No more than 2.5 percent of the lawyers in the state are named to the list.

While in law school at the University of Minnesota, Ryan served as President of the Business Law Association and as an editor of the Minnesota Journal of International Law. He also studied international law at Monash University Law School in Melbourne, Australia, and the University of Canterbury School of Law in Christchurch, New Zealand. He is a diehard fan of the Green Bay Packers and the Notre Dame Fighting Irish.

Learn

Minnebar 10 on Minnebar

Jamie Thingelstad

This session will provide an update on the continuing development of the minnestar events and organization and our efforts to insure that great events like Minnebar and Minnedemo continue to catalyze the Twin Cities technical, design and startup communities. Half of this session will provide an update on these goals and the other half will serve as a forum to hear from the community.

Jamie Thingelstad

CTO at SPS Commerce! Minnestar board member. more

Discovery

Covert DevOps - Grassroots Methods for Subtle Improvements

Bryan Welch

Have you read about DevOps and wished there was a way to get that started at your company? Don't wait for a DevOps champion. Quietly introduce the changes yourself.

In this session, we'll discuss the experiences of a single DBA who subtly introduced DevOps concepts in his workplace. We'll look at why one would do this, what it can accomplish, and the approaches that succeeded and failed. Next, we'll look at specific examples of changes implemented working with different departments, the tools used, and the benefits.

Bryan Welch

By day, Bryan is a DBA team lead working on automation, high availability, and data analytics. At night, he becomes a real nerd.

Gandhi

Ruby on High Speed Rails: Using a Debian Stable Vagrant Box

Jason Hsu

Do you hate the long and bureaucratic process of installing Ruby on Rails? Do you hate the finicky nature of Ruby on Rails installations? Do you hate it when your source code fails on another computer or in production even though it worked on your computer? Are you having difficulty installing Ruby on Rails in Windows? Do you hate it when you are unable to work on your Ruby on Rails project because you have issues with your development environment?

When basic and routine tasks require jumping through hoops, the process is broken. My Debian Stable Vagrant box is the solution. You can have Ruby on Rails up and running in under 30 minutes and with minimal effort. If you think Ruby on Rails is broken, or if you need to try out your project in a fresh Ruby on Rails environment, you can return to a fresh installation in just a few minutes with virtually no effort.

Jason Hsu

I am the pioneer of Ruby on High Speed Rails. Ruby on Rails is a great web framework and a great technology, but the stock processes for starting projects are slow, bureaucratic, and grueling. My shortcuts streamline the processes of starting projects WITHOUT cutting corners.

Be sure to attend my presentation "Ruby on High Speed Rails: Using a Debian Stable Vagrant Box". Instead of spending grueling hours installing Ruby on Rails manually, you can have Ruby on Rails ready to roll within half an hour with minimal effort. If you think your Ruby on Rails installation is broken, or if you need a fresh Ruby on Rails installation for making sure you've covered all bases, you can return your development environment to its original state with one command and just a few minutes of waiting.

I have streamlined the process of creating a Ruby gem by starting a Ruby gem called GenericGem. When you use this gem for creating your new gem, numerous details common to all or most of the gems you create will be automatically provided for you. You can even test your gem in just one step simply by running the gem_test.sh script that is included in your new source code.

I have also streamlined the process of creating a Rails project by starting a Ruby gem called GenericApp. Instead of spending hours revisiting chapters 3 through 10 in RailsTutorial.org, you can have the basic features common to most Rails projects ready to roll in a few minutes. These features include static pages, tests, automated Guard testing, Twitter bootstrap styling, databases, users, hashed passwords, account activations, and password resets.


Additionally, GenericApp includes features that you won't find in Rails Composer or Rails Bricks. You get Bash scripts that allow you to perform routine tasks in one simple step. Users are advised to use password management software to generate and store secure passwords. If you set up your project to use the PostgreSQL database in the development environment, the password and other parameters are AUTOMATICALLY set on your machine for you, and the file containing your database username and password is AUTOMATICALLY listed in the .gitignore file. You even get written outlines of the MVC structure of your Rails app.

Stephen Leacock

Tech tools for Finance & Money

Patrick Donohue

Come share and learn about sites, apps and strategies used for fundraising (pitching, pre-sales, selling stock), tracking shareholders (cap tables), communications, accounting, expenses. If money is a pain - whether fundraising, tracking expenses, tracking ownership - let's help each other out and put all of the best practices and tools on the whiteboard to help make the money portion of entrepreneurship.

And if you have a FinTech app, etc. - contact me at pd@investyr.com and I will add you to this agenda so we can highlight our local apps / companies that are making money in business easier.

Patrick Donohue

LinkedIn Profile

Crazy things I am working on...

INVESTyR

Inspiration Medical Technology

My family comes first. After that, I am working hard to level the playing field in finance and healthcare. I know... I know... big goals. It's all part of a 50 year business plan ;)

What Inspires Me:

Simon Sinek "How great Leaders Inspire Action"

Derek Sivers "How to Start a Movement"

Don Tapscott "Four Principles for the Open World"

3:45 – 4:35
Session 6

Theater

10 Lessons about Culture Change and Becoming a Catalyst for Good

Beth McKeever

When I talk with folks in software development about bringing new ideas, tools and processes to stagnant companies, I am frequently met with inspired but perplexed faces. “I can’t just start collaborating with people. It’s not that easy at my company. We don’t work like that.”

Turns out it takes more than an inspiring pep talk to get people collaborating in a meaningful way — it takes a cultural shift. But change doesn’t come easily. From my very first job as a UXer at a company with a burgeoning UX squad and incredible mentors to my current position on a team of (almost) one, I’ve screwed up a lot. But I’ve also learned a tremendous amount about instigating change, waiting patiently for change, and how a great work environment makes for healthier, happier practitioners.

Your organization is not the only one experiencing growing pains. Join me for 10 lessons on culture change and tips for becoming a catalyst for good right where you are.

Beth McKeever

Beth McKeever is a UX Engineer at Software for Good where she works with clients - like Biovest, Fair Trade USA and DIVI - who are making the world a better place. Prior to that she spent time working on Target’s mobile website and HealthPartner’s web experience for members and patients. She believes in crafting great experiences through a collaborative and lean process. Beth has spoken at MinneWebCon, UXPA MN, IxDA MN and a variety of local meetups about collaborative design and user research.

Harriet

Building the Elevator Art Shanty and a Raspberry Pi Powered T-Shirt Cannon, and CatFeeder

David Bryan
Cali Mastny
Caly McMorrow
Aaron Prust
Matt Mackall

Art Shanty Projects has been a long standing every other year event. A dozen or so artists build "Ice Houses" that have amazing themes, and then place them on a frozen lake in the middle of winter.

A group of folks came together to build Elevator Shanty. It is an Elevator simulator and experience generator. It was built by a team of 14 people in total. A subset of us wired up the hardware and programed the software for the "elevator experience". The inside was powered by several Adruinos, and a Linux computer running a custom written Python program.

We had a lot of fun making it- and would love to do a quick overview of what we did- and how we programed it.

Additionally, David Bryan will also show off a T-Shirt Cannon, and a Cat feeder that are both powered by a Raspberry Pi. David Bryan's Blog

Presenters:

  • David Bryan
  • Matt Mackall
  • Cali Masteny
  • Caly McMorrow
  • Aaron Prust
David Bryan

By Day David Bryan is into InfoSec. When not doing InfoSec, he participates in Art projects, and making things. My Blog can be found here.

Cali Mastny

I make stuff! http://waste.org/starfive/

Caly McMorrow

I'm an artist, musician and developer in St. Paul, MN. www.calymcmorrow.com

Aaron Prust

No bio.

Matt Mackall

No bio.

Minnetonka

Across the Spectrum: UX Meets IoT

David Quimby
Lukas Johnson

Aggregated computing becomes distributed computing... distributed computing becomes "hyper-distributed" computing. Monolithic content becomes granular content... granular content becomes hyper-granular content. As computing form factors march relentlessly from desktop / laptop to tablet, smartphone, and now the "Internet of Things", user interface paradigms respond accordingly.

Join us in exploring the transition between previous form factors / technology generations and extending the underlying principles of those transitions to IoT -- particularly human-scale IoT.

  • Hyper-distributed computing brings unique UX challenges / opportunities relative to other topologies

  • Human factors at human scale brings unique UX challenges / opportunities relative to other types of hyper-distributed computing

We'll present a case study of Adaptive Avenue -- an emerging hypermedia platform for automatic viewing of personalized Web content and an experiment in non-traditional media at human scale.

David Quimby

David Quimby is the inventor / founder of Adaptive Avenue -- an emerging hypermedia platform for automatic viewing of personalized Web content -- and an expert in user experience / design thinking. He is an economist, technology forecaster, and recovering corporate executive; he is also a thought leader in change management, organizational agility, and innovation ecosystems.

Lukas Johnson

Lukas Johnson is an MIS major at the Carlson School of Management and an intern at Adaptive Avenue, an emerging hypermedia platform for automatic viewing of personalized Web content. He is passionate about user experience at the intersection of emerging technologies / form factors.

Nokomis

Productivity Tools

Adrienne Peirce
Amanda Nagy

Amanda Nagy and Adrienne Peirce will share their favorite productivity tools and hear from you about yours. To Do lists, note-taking, calendars, Chrome extensions, and more!

Adrienne Peirce

I'm a Marketing Project Manager at LeadPages and a board member of Minnestar. I love productivity tools in all forms and have dabbled in many. I'm also a terrible GIMP enthusiast, a novice Rails coder, a future bee-keeper, a horrendous video editor, and a devout supporter of this tech community.

Amanda Nagy

Learning all the things!

http://www.amandanagy.com/

Zeke Landres

Gobot Meets IoT : Using Go to Control The “Things” Around Us.

Justin Grammens

The world of physical computing and the so called "Internet of Things" is getting smarter. Shouldn't we be using smarter languages as well?

Gobot is an open source robotics framework which allows developers to interface and control a multitude of devices using the Go Programming Language. We'll cover the history of where the Internet of Things is today, where it’s forecasted be in the future and why you should care. I'll also demo using Gobot to control an Arduino, Sphero and ArDrone.

Justin Grammens

I live at the intersection of community, business and education.

I am currently an engineering co-founder at Code42 Software, co-publisher of IoT Weekly News, co-founder of Arduino.MN and co-launched the first Internet of Things Hack Day in Minnesota @IoTHackday and a conference specifically on the Internet of Things called IoTFuse.

Checkout my full portfolio for more information.

Discovery

Robots and AI Won't Take Over (...If we pay attention)

Jeremy Lizakowski

I will be arguing the opposite of pop-geek culture, essentially playing Robots Advocate.

It's easy to just say "Skynet" or "robot uprising", like it is a dystopian inevitability. We need to keep the conversation going past those memes. Dystopia isn't inevitable if we pay attention.

About me: I currently build autonomous vehicles, focusing on software, AI, and HW/SW prototyping. I read about neural nets almost 30 years ago, and have been interested ever since. I often wonder when my AI's will be mature enough to be told about Asimov.

Jeremy Lizakowski

Currently:
Director of Software, Autonomous Tractor Corporation (ATC)
President, Lizakowski Research & Development, LLC

Gandhi

Reactive Extensions: Beyond the Basics

Daniel Lew

Do you already know the basic observer pattern of reactive extensions and want to take it a step further? Have you been working with reactive code for a couple months but have some lingering questions? Then this is the talk for you!

I'll go over some of the lessons I've learned after using RxJava for a while, such as:

  • Subscription management
  • Hot vs. cold Observables
  • Sharing Observables
  • When to use Subjects
  • Custom Operators
  • Backpressure
  • ...And maybe more (as I think of things to say)!

(Though the talk will have a basis in RxJava, by the nature of reactive extensions the knowledge can apply to any platform's implementation.)

Daniel Lew

Dan Lew is...

  • ...a rocket ship flying towards the sun at the speed of light. Turn to page 25.
  • ...a social media website with severe character limitations. Turn to page 199.
  • ...a baked gruyère waiting for the first brave soul to take a bite. Turn to page 85.
  • ...an Android developer at Trello. Turn to page 15.
  • ...a process in which matter is turned into energy. Turn to page 186.
Brand

Building High Powered Cross-Platform Chrome Apps with AngularJS

Stephen Fluin

I'll walk through all of the steps needed to take your run-of-the-mill Javascript and HTML5 skills to the next level by building and shipping Chrome Apps using AngularJS that work on Chrome and on Mobile.

  • Learn how AngularJS and Chrome Apps can play nicely together
  • Learn about the APIs available for you when building Chrome Apps
  • Learn about tools for getting started including NPM and Bower
Stephen Fluin

Stephen Fluin is an enthusiastic Minnesota-based Executive Technologist, Entrepreneur, and Mobile Expert. Acting as an advisor and consultant to hundreds of startup, mid-sized, and Fortune 500 companies, he combines a deep understanding of modern technology and business practices to build great software products, strategies, and experiences.

Stephen applies deep technical knowledge and lean methodologies to accelerate software development. He is a recognized Google Developer Expert in Chrome. As an avid fan of wearables and the Internet of Things, he frequently collaborates with businesses and developers in the community.

Proverb-Edison

Managing Your IT Career v7 - (Why do recruiters suck so bad?)

Paul DeBettignies

Two years ago the first question was, "Why do recruiters suck so bad?"

Last year it was the second question.

This is the 7th year of doing this kind of presentation... a few slides and a lot of Q&A and discussion.

Frequent conversations I have had lately include (and bring what is on your mind):

  • What the local job market is like right now
  • Are startups any more risky than large employers
  • How to prepare for and recover from a layoff
  • Code schools and bootcamps, are they worth the price
  • How do I create a loose confederation of consultant friends
  • Specialize or be a master of none
Paul DeBettignies

Paul DeBettignies, better known online as Minnesota Headhunter, is a Minnesota IT Recruiter who builds IT teams with startups and tech companies, creates recruiting strategies for Fortune 500 clients, author of the Minnesota Headhunter blog, the longest running regional recruiter blog and an Advisor to ToggleGreen.

He is a frequent local and national speaker, trainer and subject matter expert on recruiter, HR, career, networking and social media topics. Recent activities include presentations at Twin Cities Startup Week, Google for Entrepreneurs, Michigan Recruiters Conference, University of Minnesota, CHS, MinneBar and ERE and interviews with NPR, WCCO AM (CBS) Radio & TV, KSTP TV (ABC), MSP Business Journal, Minneapolis StarTribune and Dice.com

Paul is involved in the Minneapolis and St Paul technology, marketing and social media communities as a sponsor, volunteer and mentor and is the founder of Midwest Recruiting Bootcamp.

Stay in contact with him by clicking: LinkedIn | Twitter | Blog

Challenge

A Conversation: Racial Diversity in the Tech Space

David Edgerton

There has been a lot of press over the last few years on the absence of underrepresented groups in the tech space; specifically women. Recently companies like Google, Apple, and Facebook have released numbers highlighting this issue.

However, there isn't as much press surrounding the current racial underrepresentation in the tech industry. For example, Harvard Business Review published an article entitled 'Hacking Tech's Diversity Problem' in October 2014 but the focus was on gender diversity, not racial diversity.

The question is do we even have an issue with race in the tech space? Is the playing field level for any and everyone to enter this lucrative field? What are some of the inputs that result in the current disparity we see at some of the largest, most innovative companies in the world?

This session is to explore the issue to see what can be done to close the gaps.

David Edgerton

David Edgerton Jr. is an information technology professional with 19 years of experience in IT project and program management. When David is not running complex technology projects he teaches statistics, information systems, project management, and other business courses part-time for a few universities in the Twin Cities.

David enjoys participating in hackathons, startup weekend activities, the Minnesota Cup, and meetups to stay sharp. He is a fan of open source software and developing software products and services with the Python programming language. He is a excellent presenter and energetic facilitator of the business model canvas framework and value proposition design.

When David is not working with technology he plays the piano and produces music electronically for fun. He has a passion for startups, education, and diversity.

Learn

Using WordPress to create the MVP for your startup/business/etc.

Nick Ciske
Zack Steven
Zack Steven

WordPress is everywhere (powering over 25% of the internet).

Should it be powering your next MVP/prototype? Maybe.

I'll briefly cover my experience helping several local businesses get started with WordPress as their application development platform, why you might want to consider using WordPress, then open things up for discussion.

Nick Ciske

Current

VP of Web Engineering at Cimbura.com

Past

Owner at Thought Refinery

See Also

Co-founder of StartupsAnonymous with Dana Severson

Zack Steven

Optimist. Dad. Startup guy. Advocate for good design, big ideas and strong communities.

Co-founder at buythechange. Partner at Monkey Island.

Let's connect on Twitter: @zacksteven

Zack Steven

Optimist. Dad. Startup guy. Advocate for good design, big ideas and strong communities.

Co-founder at buythechange. Partner at Monkey Island.

Let's connect on Twitter: @zacksteven

Stephen Leacock

eSports 101: The Business of Competitive Gaming

Michael Migliacio

What started out as a few dedicated players battling each other in local LAN tournaments has sprouted into a multimillion-dollar international competitive gaming industry, drawing sponsorships from major companies like Coca-Cola, Monster Energy, and American Express.

Major competitive events featuring popular games like League of Legends, Ultra Street Fighter IV, and Dota2 draw viewerships in the hundreds of thousands, and player counts in the millions worldwide. Brand new companies at the tip of the spear of this brand new business are focusing on cultivating the eSports fanbase and connecting gamers around the world with their favorite professional players and brands.

What makes competitive gaming so special? Why is it taking off now? Where is it going in the future? How is big business getting involved?

Join software developer and professional eSports journalist Michael Migliacio to discover the answers to these questions and much, much more.

Michael Migliacio

A lifetime fighting game fan, journalist, producer, and professional software engineer, Michael wears a lot of hats in the gaming industry.

As a web content developer and journalist for professional eSports organization Evil Geniuses/GoodGame Agency, Michael has traveled the world with some of the biggest names in competitive fighting games including Justin Wong, Ricky Ortiz, and Yusuke Momochi, and also attends events throughout the year on behalf of the organization. Most recently, Michael was responsible for handling interpretation for Japanese competitors during the SXSW Fighters Invitational in Austin, Texas.

Outside of writing and fighting, Michael is currently producing the upcoming Wii U puzzler ASTRAL BREAKERS for Intropy Games and previously lead the engineering team responsible for crafting the IGN Pokedex. He has also produced editorial content on a freelance basis for outlets large and small, including both USgamer and IGN.com.

Contact Twitter (@angstygaijin) | LinkedIn

Tackle

Top 10 Tech Law Developments This Year

Damien Riehl

What are some of the most important technology law developments over the past year? Notable lawsuits and legislation span areas that include privacy, social media, copyright, patents, trademarks, security, licensing, and cloud computing. A technology litigator will discuss the evolving tech law landscape, as well as trends that will likely continue to affect technologists in the coming year. Attorney Damien Riehl frequently speaks and writes on legal topics that affect businesses, including the legal implications of the Internet and technology.

Damien Riehl

Damien Riehl is an attorney who practices in business litigation and intellectual property litigation, serving as past Chair of the Minnesota State Bar Association's Computer & Technology Law Section. He has clerked for state and federal judges, began coding BASIC at 12 years old, has developed websites since 1995, teaches a course for lawyers who serve on nonprofit boards, and speaks frequently on technology law issues.

LinkedIn

Louis Pasteur

What's New With Drupal?

Tim Erickson

Drupal is open source CMS software maintained and developed by a community of over 1,000,000 users and developers. Drupal can be suitable for projects as small as a personal blog or for large scale enterprise projects.

The Twin Cities is home to one of the most vibrant and active Drupal communities in the country. With multiple meet-ups per month and one of the best Drupal Camps in the country.

This session will include:

  • A brief introduction to what Drupal is
  • A guide to the local Drupal community and how you can get involved in Drupal development
  • A list of some great tools and strategies for getting started with Drupal
  • An update and very brief tour of Drupal 8 - which is currently in Beta release
Tim Erickson

I'm a long time resident of the Twin Cities who is very active in the local, national, and international Drupal community. I've presented at several local Drupal Camps across the Midwest and am scheduled to present at Drupalcon Los Angeles, in May.

I spent many years working in the area of online civic engagement with E-Democracy.org and have a strong interest in online communities.

I recently partnered with two other local Drupal developers to create Triplo. Triplo is a local Drupal Development shop that also provides mentoring and support services to local freelance internet designers and developers.

4:45 – 7:00
Beer Me!